Posts Tagged ‘Julian Assange’

Ecuador: Assange granted political asylum

Saturday, November 22nd, 2014

Julian Assange ‘welcome to stay in Ecuador embassy’

Ecuador has guaranteed political asylum to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange for “as long as necessary,” one day after he lost an appeal against a Swedish warrant for his arrest.

Ecuador Ratifies Julian Assange Asylum Status, Offers Sweden Access To WikiLeaks Founder

Ecuador ratified Friday its diplomatic asylum status for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who has been living in the country’s London embassy since June 2012 to avoid being extradited to Sweden, where he faces sexual assault charges. The move makes official Assange’s protected status and means he can remain under the country’s protection indefinitely.

I do not know for certain what, if any, charges Assange would face in the USA at this point.



Ecuador: Rafael Correa at Yale UPDATED

Friday, April 11th, 2014

Rafael Correa wants your money. Carlos Eire reports:

He demanded the “hegemonic” industrialized nations pay Ecuador and all other nations with rain forests for the oxygen produced by the trees in those forests. I let out a chuckle. Much to my surprise no one else laughed.

He also demanded that Ecuador be paid for all of the petroleum that he refuses to extract from its soil in order to keep the rain forest pristine. Not drilling for oil costs Ecuador billions of dollars, he complained. Some clapped enthusiastically.

And he demanded that the “hegemonic” industrialized nations pay fines to the non-industrialized nations as recompense for the air pollution caused by their industries and vehicles. More applause.

Even more applause greeted his proposal to abolish intellectual property and patents. No one should charge for what they invent, and perhaps not even for what they manufacture, he argued.

He called these proposals “a new distribution of labor” and railed against the present “world order” as unjust and “immoral.”

Maybe I ought to demand that Ecuador pay me for the oxygen produced by the trees in my yard, and for not fracking on my property, for the sakes of “a new distribution of labor” or something.

UPDATE:
The Five questions for President Correa that Dr. Eire was not allowed to ask.

4. Mr. President, it is common knowledge that Ecuador wants to return to international financial markets to borrow money again following its 2008 default. Yet you yourself have publicly attacked bond holders, calling them “true monsters.” Outside institutions tend to think that the rule of law and protection for investors is weak in Ecuador. So what is the case you make for investing in Ecuador today?

You can watch the whole lecture here (the YouTube starts right away) below the fold:

(more…)

The leakers: Who’s to gain?

Monday, January 20th, 2014

Princeton University professor Sean Wilentz, contributing editor of The New Republic, asks, Would You Feel Differently About Snowden, Greenwald, and Assange If You Knew What They Really Thought? 

The payoff of the Snowden affair for Putin and the Russians thus far has been substantial. Just as the Kremlin’s human rights reputation, already woeful under Putin, has spiraled downward, it is able to swoop in to rescue an American political outlaw, supposedly persecuted by the Obama administration. The dissident journalist Masha Gessen has observed, “The Russian propaganda machine has not gotten this much mileage out of a U.S. citizen since Angela Davis’s murder trial in 1971.”

Go read the whole thing.

Ecuador: Cléver Jiménez, accused of hacking, gets raided. Assange & Snowden could not be reached for comment.

Saturday, December 28th, 2013

Ecuadorian Assemblyman Cléver Jiménez claims to have documentation of corruption in high places, which has displeased president Rafael Correa.

Correa’s been tweeting about it, in a 4-part tweet, which started with:
Months-long hacking of the accounts of the President and high officials. Investigations lead to Cléver Jiménez and his “advisor” Fernando . . .

Now Jiménez is under investigation for espionage, and yesterday his home was raided in his absence by a SWAT team, 3 criminologists, a prosecutor from Pichincha and a number of his aides. Jiménez’s attorney stated the raid was carried out without a warrant. Additionally, Jiménez’s office at the National Assembly was raided and his computer and documents were removed.

I could not reach Julian Assange in London for his reaction to the warrantless raid by the government of his patron Correa, who claims ‘Britain is violating Julian Assange’s human rights,’ while Correa persecutes an elected official for hacking.

Likewise, Edward Snowden, who, when asking for asylum, praised Correa,

who would risk standing for the human rights of an individual against the most powerful government on earth, and the bravery of Ecuador and its people is an example to the world

ought to come out of his Russian hidey-hole and stand for Jiménez’s rights.

Assange’s not going to like Ecuador

Friday, September 27th, 2013

Gleen Garvin in today’s Miami Herald: Julian Assange and Ecuador’s strangled press.

While the movie starring a bleached Benedict Cumberbatch is coming out next month and the real-life Assange is stuck in the Ecuadorian embassy in London, the fact is that if he gets political asylum in Ecuador, he’ll most likely end up in jail:

Aside from the Castro brothers, there’s nobody in the Western Hemisphere who’s trying harder to do away with freedom of the press than Assange’s putative champion, Ecuador’s rambunctiously left-wing president Rafael Correa. In June, Correa pushed through a law establishing the crime of “media lynching,” defined as the “dissemination of information” with “the purpose of discrediting” someone. If Richard Nixon had access to a law like that, maybe Woodward and Bernstein would have won a second Pulitzer for their prison diaries.

You’d think even the most hyperactive despot would rest on his laurels for a while after passing a masterpiece like the media-lynching law, but for all the criticism of Correa, nobody has ever attacked his work ethic. Earlier this month, his chief legal advisor asked the legislature to let the government start jailing people for wisecracks on Facebook, Twitter and other social media.

If Assange thinks he has it bad now . . .

Ecuador: Maybe Assange ought to keep his mouth shut

Friday, June 28th, 2013

The guy holed up at the London embassy may not be the best broker on the Snowden case, especially since Assange serves as a reminder of Ecuador’s impotence in getting the UK to grant him safe passage:

So near, and yet, so far.


Ecuador Disarray Clouds Snowden Bid
Disarray in Ecuador over the role of Wikileaks’ Assange in Snowden’s asylum bid is complicating the outcome, according to diplomatic mail.

Mr. Assange—the antisecrecy-group founder who for the past year has been sheltered inside Ecuador’s London embassy—wrote to Ecuadorean officials Monday that he hoped his role in the Snowden matter hadn’t embarrassed the government, according to an internal Ecuadorean diplomatic correspondence obtained by Spanish-language broadcaster Univision Networks and reviewed by The Wall Street Journal.

But in the note, Mr. Assange also offered public-relations advice to top Ecuadorean officials about how to handle the crisis. Mr. Assange’s earlier efforts on Mr. Snowden’s behalf had prompted one diplomat to caution that Mr. Assange could be perceived as “running the show” in Ecuador.

Uh-oh.

Julian better watch it, or he may find himself out of lodgings, too.


The Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, August 20th, 2012

ARGENTINA
Enter the Food Chain

BRAZIL
A moment of truth for Dilma
The president needs to do more to tackle the “Brazil cost”

Rio de Janeiro’s Olympics
The countdown starts
Compare and contrast with London

CUBA
200 Political Arrests in Just Two Weeks

A Graduate of my ‘Commie’ High School Goes to Cuba and Sees Paradise, or How One’s Education Can Warp You for Life, via Ed Driscoll.

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Spanish firm says Dominican gov’t seized assets

ECUADOR
Wikileaks’ Assange and Ecuador’s Correa: Made for Each Other

Julian Assange ‘will be given asylum in Ecuador’
Julian Assange is expected to be granted asylum in Ecuador by President Rafael Correa, it has been reported.

EL SALVADOR
El Salvador’s VP Campaigns for Votes in N.Y.
A politician who celebrated the 9/11 attacks on the U.S. gets the ‘key’ to Long Island’s Nassau County

LATIN AMERICA
Silent Running
Russian attack submarine sailed in Gulf of Mexico undetected for weeks, U.S. officials say

MEXICO
Mexico: Criminal Leader Found Dead

In Mexico’s murder city, the war appears over

PUERTO RICO
Puerto Rico Votes to Amend Constitution

Puerto Rico plans to vote on a two-part referendum Sunday that could see the island amend its constitution for the first time in nearly half a century.
The referendum would reduce the size of the U.S. territory’s government by almost 30 percent as a cost-cutting measure, and would give judges the right to deny bail in certain murder cases. Puerto Rico currently is the only place in the Western hemisphere where all suspects, including those charged with rape and murder, are entitled to bail.

Religious Left Infatuation with Puerto Rican Terror

VENEZUELA
My dog sabotaged my homework

Is Obama Protecting Hugo Chavez?

Venezuela: Law regulating leases wreaks havoc on housing market

The week’s posts:
Puerto Rico says “No”

Puerto Rico referendum: Live coverage

Yoani Sanchez on Assange’s asylum

Chavez insists the “mercenary” is real

This morning’s no-surprise news: Corzine and Assange UPDATE

Seals vs. El Chapo?

Willful blindness: Lonely Planet and Rough Guides


Yoani Sanchez on Assange’s asylum VIDEO ADDED

Saturday, August 18th, 2012

Blogger Yoani Sanchez, finds a paradox (link via Voces del destierro) on Assange’s choice of political asylum,

“Un hombre (Assange) que simbolizó a una especie de Robin Hood de la información ha terminado siendo cobijado en el castillo feudal de un Gobierno que evidentemente tiene una política rígida, agresiva hacia los medios de comunicación y la libertad de información”, señaló Sánchez.

A man (Assange) who symbolized a sort of Robin Hood of information ends up sheltered in the feudal castle of a government that obviously has a rigid, aggressive policy against the media and freedom of information.”

The WSJ editorial board looks at Rafael Correa’s motivation,

Mr. Correa’s real motivation is to show solidarity with a fellow enemy of Western democracies. The consolation for the West is that Mr. Assange and his Ecuadorean protectors may have to live with each other for a very long time.

Until Britain grants Assange safe passage, however, Julian’s stuck at the embassy.

UPDATE,
VIDEO

This morning’s no-surprise news: Corzine and Assange UPDATE

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

Assange first:
As expected, Ecuador Grants Asylum to Assange, Defying Britain

Ecuador announced Thursday that it was granting political asylum to Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks, who has been holed up for two months in the Ecuadorean Embassy in London awaiting the decision.

The move leaves Mr. Assange with protection from arrest only on Ecuadorean territory, meaning he could only leave the embassy for Ecuador with British cooperation.

Huffing and puffing,

Just before the announcement by Foreign Minister Ricardo Patiño at a news conference in the Ecuadorean capital, Quito, President Rafael Correa said on his Twitter account: “No one is going to terrorize us!” The night before, Mr. Patiño said that the British authorities had threatened to force their way into the embassy, to which he responded: “We are not a British colony.”

Reading from a government communiqué, Mr. Patiño said: “The government of Ecuador, faithful to its tradition of protecting those who seek refuge in its territory or in its diplomatic missions, has decided to grant diplomatic asylum to Julian Assange.”

He added, “There are indications to presume that there could be political persecution,” and that Mr. Assange would not get a fair trial in the United States and could face the death penalty there.

The article points out that “Mr. Assange arrived at the embassy on June 19, seeking to avoid extradition to Sweden“, but never mind,

Mr. Patiño said he hoped Britain would permit Mr. Assange to leave the embassy in London for Ecuador — a request Britain has rejected, saying it has a binding, legal obligation to extradite Mr. Assange to Sweden, where he is wanted for questioning over accusations that he sexually assaulted two women.

The British Foreign Office said it was disappointed by the Ecuadorean announcement but remained committed to a negotiated outcome to the standoff. Sweden called the decision “unacceptable” and summoned Ecuador’s ambassador, The Associated Press reported.

Mr. Patiño’s news conference was broadcast live on British television and Mr. Assange watched the announcement as it happened, British news reports said. He told embassy staff members: “It is a significant victory for myself and my people. Things will probably get more stressful now.”

Particularly if it serves a propaganda purpose. The Mex Files is expecting the masses to rise,

While war is the extension of diplomacy by other means, that doesn’t mean a shootin’ war, by any means, but the British are likely to pay a very high price for these intemperate claims: I would expect at a minimum that British Embassies throughout Latin America are going to be besieged and quite a few windows broken, and various Latin American (and probably other) states enacting policies and procedures designed to make life difficult for British passport holders (amazing what Immigration and Customs service types can come up with when they want) and I fully expect British-owned businesses (some of which — like HSBC — are already seen as “dodgy” to use Brit-speak ) might be in a zealous application of existing regulatory and oversight functions.

I’m too cynical to get a rise over Assange. Perhaps that’s why The Mex Files refers to my blog as “The far right-wing Latin American website.”

Speaking of cynicism, No Criminal Case Is Likely in Loss at MF Global, surprise, surprise!

In the most telling indication yet that the MF Global investigation is winding down, federal authorities are seeking to interview the former chief of the firm, Jon S. Corzine, next month, according to the people involved in the case. Authorities hope that Mr. Corzine, who is expected to accept the invitation, will shed light on the actions of other employees at MF Global.

Those developments indicate that federal prosecutors do not expect to file criminal charges against the former New Jersey governor. Mr. Corzine has not yet received assurances that he is free from scrutiny, but two rounds of interviews with former employees and a review of thousands of documents have left prosecutors without a case against him, say the people involved in the investigation who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

Imagine that: Prosecutors can’t build a case against a guy who simply doesn’t know where $1.2 billion of his clients money is, but who also managed to raise $500,000 for Obama.

Ed Morrisey‘s asking,

Ahem. What kind of “porous risk controls” allowed MF Global to bet money that wasn’t theirs on Euro-zone debt?

Good question.

But, fret not,

Mr. Corzine, in a bid to rebuild his image and engage his passion for trading, is weighing whether to start a hedge fund, according to people with knowledge of his plans.

Can’t wait to see what he calls it!

Cross-posted in The Green Room.

UPDATE,
WARNING: Language not suitable for work
Here’s why Julian Assange is the most annoying and arrogant person in the whole world


Assange comfy…at the Ecuadorian embassy

Monday, July 9th, 2012

For Assange, home comforts inside Ecuador embassy

HOW IS ASSANGE LIVING INSIDE THE EMBASSY?
Assange is living and working pretty much as normal inside a small office that also serves as his bedroom. Supporters say he could continue to reside in the embassy, close to the world famous Harrods store in upscale Knightsbridge, for months. Gavin MacFadyen, a supporter and director of the Center for Investigative Journalism at London’s City University, has visited Assange inside the building and says that while “it’s not quite the Hilton,” embassy staffers are “jolly” and getting along well with the activist. The embassy has about five or six rooms and previously was used as a single apartment. Assange has a bed, access to a phone and a connection to the Internet. He can also receive guests, though the space is cramped. The crowded embassy is in sharp contrast to Assange’s last permanent address — Ellingham Hall, a supporter’s elegant country house on vast grounds in eastern England.

Hey, he’s in Knightsbridge, rent-free, and can send out for take-out from Harrods. With that, who needs an “elegant country house on vast grounds”?

Jazz Shaw appraises the situation,

If Ecuador either liked us or feared us enough, we could probably jump in and help the Brits with this Assange extradition situation, but they seem to be neither. That’s not to say that the UK may not still pry Assange out, particularly if helping him doesn’t seem to provide any real benefit to Ecuador, but it looks like the US will be sitting this one out on the sidelines.

Jazz is an optimist: I fully expect the current administration to wait until the foil goes on the windows and then send the American ambassador to call on Julian.