Archive for the ‘politics’ Category

Nicaragua: A reminder on the sandinistas

Friday, August 8th, 2014

I have an article coming up later today on a related topic, so please keep the following in mind:
The Black Book of the Sandinistas

In emulating Castro and their other communist heroes such as Stalin and Mao, the Sandinistas took control of everything in the country: mass organizations, the army, police, labor unions, and the media. They censored all freedom of speech, suspended the right of association and ruthlessly crushed the freedom of trade unions. Faithful to their Marxist ideology, the new tyrants seized the means of production. State controls and nationalization spread, aid to the private sector and incentives for foreign investment disappeared. To put it plainly, another 20th-century experiment with socialism annihilated a nation’s economy along with a peoples’ prospects for a better life.

Thousands of Nicaraguans who attempted to protect their property — or who simply committed the crime of owning private property — were imprisoned, tortured, or executed by the new despots.

Unlike the previous regime of Anastasio Somoza, the Sandinistas did not leave the native populations on the Atlantic coast of Nicaragua in peace. In Khmer Rouge style, they inflicted a ruthless, forcible relocation of thousands of Indians from their land. Like Stalin and Mao, the new regime used state-created famine as a weapon against these “enemies of the people.” [2] The Sandinista army committed myriad atrocities against the Indian population, killing and imprisoning approximately 15,000 innocent people. The Sandinista crimes included not only mass murders of innocent natives themselves, but a calculated liquidation of their entire leadership — as the Soviets had perpetrated against the Poles in the Katyn Forest Massacre, when the Soviet secret police executed approximately 15,000 Polish officers in the spring of 1940.

The Sandinistas quickly distinguished themselves as one of the worst human rights abusers in Latin America, carrying out approximately 8,000 political executions within three years of the revolution. The number of “anti-revolutionary” Nicaraguans who disappeared while in Sandinista hands numbered in the thousands. By 1983, the number of political prisoners inside the new Marxist regime’s jails was estimated at 20,000. [3] This was the highest number of political prisoners in any nation in the hemisphere — except, of course, in Castro’s Cuba. By 1986, a vicious and violent Sandinista “resettlement program” forced some 200,000 Nicaraguans into 145 “settlements” throughout the country. This monstrous social engineering program entailed the designation of “free-fire” zones in which Sandinista government troops shot and killed any peasant of their choosing. [4]

The Sandinista Gulag also institutionalized torture. Political prisoners in Sandinista jails, such as Las Tejas,were consistently beaten, deprived of sleep and given electric shocks. They were routinely denied food and water and kept in dark cubicles known as chiquitas (little ones), that had a surface area of less than one square meter. These cubicles were too small to sit up in, were completely dark, and had no sanitation and almost no ventilationPrisoners were also forced to stand for long periods without bending their arms or legs; they were locked into steel hot boxes exposed to the full force of the tropical sun; their daughters or wives were sexually assaulted in front of them; and some prisoners were mutilated and skinned alive before being executed. One sadistic Sandinista practice was known as corte de cruz; this was a drawing-and-quartering technique in which the prisoner’s limbs were severed from the body, leaving him to bleed to death. [5]

The result of all of these horrifying cruelties and barbarisms was yet another mass exodus from a country enslaved by communism with tens of thousands of Nicaraguans escaping and settling in Honduras, Costa Rica and the United States. [6]

As most Marxist regimes, the Sandinista despotism accompanied its internal repression with external aggression. With Soviet and Cuban aid

Read the whole thing here.

In case you missed it,

Thursday, July 31st, 2014

Last night’s podcast, Memories of old Havana PLUS US-Latin America stories of the week with Graciela Chelo Lodeiro, and host Silvio Canto Jr.

This week in smart diplomacy

Friday, July 18th, 2014

My latest at Da Tech Guy Blog, This week in smart diplomacy, is up. Please read it, comment, and hit Da Tip Jar!

Today’s update on the immigrant invasion

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

At Drudge:

Flood the border. Crisis. Opportunity:

Obama wants to use the crisis for one of two things (or maybe both, come to think of it): (1) coercing Republicans into passing a “comprehensive” bill and giving him what he wants, on pain of being called obstructionist do-nothings (2) doing it himself and getting exactly what he wants.

So far, the plan has worked for him.


Bean-counting Catholic justices

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

faustaBack in the Middle Ages, theologians would count how many angels could dance on the head of a pin; now the Left is Bean-counting Catholic justices.

Read my latest at Da Tech Guy Blog.

While you’re at it, listen to last night’s podcast, Are Liberals Patriotic? I was Rick Moran’s guest.

Did you know the IRS employees are unionized?

Wednesday, June 25th, 2014

>Wonders never cease, so read my post at Da Tech Guy Blog.

5 lessons Hillary could learn from Isabel

Wednesday, June 18th, 2014

What can the former FLOTUS learn from the first season of Spanish TV series Isabel? find out at Da Tech Guy blog!

Colombia: The #WorldCup team won; will Santos? UPDATED

Sunday, June 15th, 2014

UPDATE:

Earlier today,

Today’s Colombia’s run-off election.

2014 World Cup: Colombia beats Greece 3-0 in Group C opener.

Pres. Santos thinks it’ll get him another term:
Colombian Leader Sets Goal: Win Soccer Match, Then Win Presidency
President Juan Manuel Santos, Whose Job Is at Stake in a Sunday Election, Hopes for a Political Assist from His World Cup Team.
I don’t quite get the logic, but apparently it has to do with the thought that larger turnout would favor Santos,

Political strategists say a Colombian victor [sic] against Greece on Saturday in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, could generate a broad feel-good moment for Colombia, drive higher voter turnout the next day and tip the scales in Mr. Santos’s favor over his rival, Óscar Iván Zuluaga.

That’s assuming that

  1. The fans are not hungover, and they’ll want to go out and vote, and 
  2. The fans are not staying home or at the sports bar or sports club watching whatever other game may be on:
  3. Ricardo Rodríguez, a soccer-loving doorman from Bogotá, is one fan who plans to forgo voting Sunday. “It’s a thousand times better to see soccer than to go out to vote,” he said.

I don’t know enough of Colombian political thinking to guess whether the average Joe conflates the soccer team with “team Santos”, if at all.

We’ll find out later this evening.


Tonight’s podcast, 8PM Eastern

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

Kids on the US-Mexico border & other US-Latin America stories of the week with Miguel Portillo-Cuadra from El Salvador, and of course host Silvio Canto.

Listen live, and also archived for your listening convenience.

Democrat Chavista for Congress!

Tuesday, June 3rd, 2014

A political whore is someone who would do anything to get elected, and now Arizona’s 7th Congressional District has its own.

Meet Scott Fistler:

Scott Fistler didn’t have much luck as a Republican candidate. He lost a 2012 write-in campaign against U.S. Rep. Ed Pastor, then lost a 2013 bid for a Phoenix city council seat now held by Laura Pastor, Ed’s daughter.

After petitioning a state superior court last November and paying $319, Fistler now legally shares the name of the celebrated labor movement icon, Cesar Chavez. Earlier this year, Chavez (formerly Fistler) became a Democrat, and – before Ed Pastor announced his retirement from Congress – filed to run in the heavily Hispanic 7th Congressional District.

The original union activist Cesar Chavez opposed illegal immigration. Makes ou wonder how that would go over in his district, doesn’t it?

But don’t fret. Fistler/Chavez is not taking questions:

Chavez did lay out some ground rules for media questions, should he be able to get to them. Questions must be screened, no more than five questions, no question longer than five words and Chavez will not discuss his name change, he explained in the email.

Not stepping in enough doo-doo as it is, Fistler/Chavez crowns his campaign by using photographs of Chavista demonstrations in Caracas, which had been carefully staged for deceased dictator Hugo Chavez as the crowds were bussed in and paid.

Meanwhile, in Venezuela, Hugo’s legacy lives on.