Archive for the ‘Mexico’ Category

Mexico: Iguala mayor arrested

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

BBC reports,
Mayor held in Mexico missing caseJose Luis Abarca stands up during a meeting with state government officials in Chilpancingo on 8 May 2014
Police in Mexico say they have arrested the fugitive mayor of the town of Iguala, where 43 students went missing in September.

Jose Luis Abarca was detained by federal police officers in the capital, Mexico City, a police spokesman said.

Abarca’s wife Maria de los Angeles Pineda was also arrested.

All 43 students are still missing. The BBC has a timeline:

Timeline: Iguala disappearance

26 Sept: Students from a teacher training college in Ayotzinapa travel to Iguala to protest and raise funds

Night of 26 Sept: Police stop the students, 6 people are shot dead, 43 students disappear

30 Sept: Iguala mayor Jose Luis Abarca asks for leave from his post, which is granted

4 Oct: Mass graves are found near Iguala containing 28 bodies

19 Oct: Federal police are deployed to Iguala and replace the municipal force

22 Oct: Mexico’s prosecutor general says an arrest warrant has been issued for Mr Abarca, his wife and the town’s police chief

23 Oct: Guerrero state governor Angel Aguirre resigns

29 Oct: President Enrique Pena Nieto meets the relatives of the missing students and promises a “renewed search plan”

4 Nov: Mr Abarca and his wife are arrested in Mexico City

In other crime news, Mexican Regional Security Chief and Wife Shot Dead
Tamaulipas Is Across Border From Texas

The dead man, Gen. Ricardo Niño Villarreal, was security chief for the area around Nuevo Laredo, across the border from Laredo, Texas. The area is considered the turf of the Zetas drug cartel, which has been doing battle with the Gulf cartel.



The Tahmooressi release Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

The big news of the week: Mexico finally released Marine Sgt. Andrew Tahmooressi, after holding him in jail for seven months on gun charges – and how perfectly timed!

ARGENTINA
Argentina Borrows $814 Million in Currency Swap with China (h/t Carlos Eire)

Argentina’s Disturbing New Low
In avoiding its debts, the country gambles with contempt and faces the discipline of international markets.

BOLIVIA
Freddy Mamani: ‘New Andean’ architecture is turning Bolivia into an electric wonderland
A young pioneer has declared war on the dull and colorless. You might want to reach for sunglasses.

BRAZIL
Dilma Rousseff Prevails in Campaign Marred by Violence
Petrobras Corruption Allegations Reignite Hostile Relationship with Brazilian Media

Female Brazilian murderers marry – and refuse to be separated – in jail
Suzanne Von Richthofen was 18 when jailed in 2002 after arranging for her parents to be killed in their luxury home
They were both behind murders which shocked Brazil, but Suzanne Von Richthofen has turned down parole to stay in Sao Paulo state prison with Regina Sanchez after the pair fell in love and married behind bars

CHILE
Chilean Parents Rise to Protest Anti-Profit Education Reform
Bachelet’s New Majority Coalition Forging On with Major Campaign Promise

COLOMBIA
Colombian Farc in civilian admission
Colombia’s Farc rebel group acknowledges for the first time that its actions in Latin America’s longest internal conflict “affected civilians”.

Despite the intransigence of the FARC and the opposition, the peace process is still alive

CUBA
More Uneducated Attacks from The New York Times

Russell Brand’s Revolution For Morons
The movie star’s political manifesto is full of mistakes, misquotes, and is utterly misguided, unfunny, illogical, and unreadable. Watch the copies fly from the shelves.

Indeed, Brand proclaims himself “a big fan of [Fidel] Castro and [Che] Guevara” because “they were sexy, cool, tough” and the fetid autocracy they imposed on the Cuban people “was a remarkable success in many respects.” (Fidel is also described as being “double cool” for a four-hour, filibustering courtroom speech, while Che Guevara is described as a “dear, beautiful, morally unimpeachable” revolutionary.)

And what were those successes, in a country that routinely ranks as one of the least free countries on the planet? “Education for everyone, land sharing, emancipation of women, and equal rights for black Cubans.” This latter achievement would come as a welcome surprise to black Cubans, who are second-class citizens—equal only in the sense that, like all Cubans, they too have no rights. And yes, education is for everyone—provided they want to read wooden agitprop about how education in Cuba is for everyone.

Of which Fidel boasted, claiming “Cubans are the most cultured people in the world.”

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Oscar Taveras: Road safety in the Dominican Republic
Gone too soon

. . . thorny political, economic and cultural factors have conspired against Dominican motorists. The government’s nominal motorcycle-helmet and seat-belt laws apply only to drivers, not passengers, and enforcement of speed limits and drunk-driving rules is lax. The WHO report scored its efforts in those areas just a three and a two out of ten. Less than 10% of tickets issued for vehicular infractions ever get paid, and drive-through liquor stores and alcohol sales at petrol stations expose drivers to constant temptation. Unions representing bus and taxi drivers have opposed proposed bills that could expose them to new regulation.

ECUADOR
Ecuador’s National Assembly to Vote on Term Limits
Court Rules Lawmakers Will Determine if President Correa Can Be Re-Elected Indefinitely

IMMIGRATION
Obama’s Border Policy Fueled Epidemic, Evidence Shows

JAMAICA
The Asianisation to Jamaica

LATIN AMERICA
GAO: State Department Fails to Produce Reports on Iranian Adventurism in Latin America

MEXICO
Mass Graves, Murderous State-Cartel Alliance Revealed in Guerrero
Hundreds of Bodies Found Near Iguala, Mexico, But Not the 43 Students

Keeping Mexico’s Revolutionary Fires Alive

Crisis in Mexico: Could Forty-Three Missing Students Spark a Revolution? Revolution against whom?

PACIFIC ALLIANCE
Looking to “Doing Business” in Latam, try the Pacific Alliance, forget Mercosur
The World Bank’s “Doing Business” global rating is not very enthusiastic about Latin American and the Caribbean which only first surfaces in position 34 out of the 189 countries considered.

PANAMA
Panel discusses big changes coming at the Panama Canal

PARAGUAY
The Place Where Rutherford B. Hayes Is A Really Big Deal

PERU
Peru says most of $3 bln in bonds sold to manage existing debt

PUERTO RICO

Puerto Rico Government Looks to Raise Tax on OilLegislators filed a measure Thursday that could raise the excise tax on a barrel of crude oil from $9.25 to $15.50, to generate $178 million a year. It also would allow the Highway and Transportation Authority’s loan to be transferred to Puerto Rico’s Infrastructure Financing Authority, which is authorized to issue bonds

URUGUAY
Uruguay registers cannabis growers
The Uruguayan government announces the start of registration for licensed cannabis growers as part of its plan to legalise the drug.

VENEZUELA
Unhappy Halloween: Very Scary Stuff From the Castro Colony of Caracastan

Elías Jaua’s nanny detained in Brazil for gun possession has been released

The week’s posts and podcast:
Bad news for Chile

Mexico: Tahmooressi released, back in US

Mexico: 3 siblings, US citizens, dead

Venezuela: last on property rights

Dancing the hemisphere

Brazil: The election was tweeted

Venezuela to appeal ICSID Exxon decision

Brazil: Ibovespa volatility

At Da Tech Guy Blog
About those walking in NYC for ten hours videos

Whatever happened to the Carnival Magic with the ebola scare?

Podcast
Elections in Brazil PLUS other US-Latin America stories of the week



Mexico: Tahmooressi released, back in US

Saturday, November 1st, 2014

Marine Sgt. Andrew Tahmooressi freed from Mexican jail, immediately returns to US after strong diplomatic support, seven months in prison,

While his defense rested its case several weeks ago, Tahmooressi’s release came only after a strong diplomatic push from former Gov. Bill Richardson of New Mexico and Reps. Ed Royce (R-CA) and Matt Salmon (R-AZ).

The three officials, along with Tahmooressi’s mother Jill, have spent the last week in Tijuana pressing officials for his release.

Mexico: 3 siblings, US citizens, dead

Friday, October 31st, 2014

Siblings Erica, Jose Angel and Alex Alvarado Rivera, who had been visiting their father in Mexico, have been found dead,
Mexican State Authorities Say Three U.S. Citizens Found Dead
Siblings, Missing for More Than Two Weeks, Found Shot to Death Near Border City of Matamoros
. They

had been visiting their father in Mexico and disappeared Oct. 13 along with Jose Guadalupe Castaneda Benitez, Erica Alvarado’s 32-year-old boyfriend.
. . .
Parents of the siblings have said witnesses reported they were seized by men dressed in police gear identifying themselves as “Hercules,” a tactical security unit in the violent border city racked by cartel infighting. Mr. Quintanilla said at a news conference Thursday that nine of the unit’s 40 officers are being questioned.

It would the third recent case of abuse and killing by Mexican authorities if police are involved. The country already is engulfed in the case of 43 teachers-college students missing in southern Guerrero state allegedly at the hands of a mayor and police working with a drug cartel. Fifty-six people are under arrest, including dozens of police officers.

In June, the army killed 22 suspected gang members in Mexico state and then altered the scene and intimidated witnesses to hide the fact that most were executed after they surrendered, a National Commission on Human Rights report said last week. Three soldiers face murder charges.

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto met with parents of 43 teachers college students Wednesday for the first time since they disappeared over a month ago

when investigators say police detained the students and handed them over to a drug gang.

In other news, Andrew Tahmooressi’s Family Hopeful for His Release From Mexican Prison by Veterans Day.

I guess Mexico’s police applies the rule of law or not.



The return of the Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, October 27th, 2014

LatinAmerAfter skipping a week because of unpacking, the Carnival’s back, while the unpacking’s not finished.

Brazil and Uruguay held presidential elections yesterday. Voters went for the same old, same old.

ARGENTINA
Life terms for Argentina jail crimes
An Argentine ex-police chief and ex-interior minister are among 15 people given life sentences for involvement in a torture centre in the 1970s.

BRAZIL
Why is Dilma Hiding Business Deals With Cuba?

Boa sorte, Brasil

Brazil poll shows Neves leading election, at odds with major surveys

Dilma Rousseff’s dizzy spell live on TV after presidential debate
Dilma Rousseff, the president of Brazil, was briefly taken ill on Thursday at the end of a bruising political debate with presidential rival Aecio Neves

In Brazil’s Election, a Stark Vote on the Nation’s Economy

CHILE
Bomb That Killed Man in Chile Meant to Blow Up Prison Guard Building

COLOMBIA
Alexander Beltran Herrera, US judge sentences Farc commander
A US judge has sentenced an ex-Colombian rebel to 27 years in prison for his role in the kidnapping of three American citizens in 2003.

Marcos de Jesus Figueroa, alias “Maquitos Figueroa,” Colombian Drug Lord Captured in Brazil Wanted for 100 Murders

COSTA RICA
Solís a Trojan Horse for Socialism in Costa Rica
Relationships Bloom with Trade Unions, University Students, Chavistas

CUBA
Religious persecution disguised by Castro regime as a crackdown on “criminal” activities

Cuban Ladies In White, other activists arrested as they support political prisoner Sonia Garro

Must-Read: Are Cuba and Brazil Partners in Human Trafficking?

Cuban Docs Should be Banned from Ebola Fight, Restrict US-Cuba Flights

Quote of the day: “I have loved justice and hated iniquity; therefore I die in exile.”

ECUADOR
HRW Criticizes Correa for Applauding Police Abuse During Protests

HONDURAS
Just Say No to Presidential Reelection in Honduras
Too Many “Necessary” Men in Latin America

MEXICO

Mexico’s Burgeoning Wine Scene
Mexico may be best known for its beer and tequila, but that’s slowly changing as its wines are finding their way onto restaurant wine lists and specialist shops.

Amado Yáñez shows up at the burn-out unit (in Spanish):

PANAMA
If Panama’s Anti-Corruption Hunt Continues, Miami Should Watch Out

PARAGUAY
Report Oil Found in Paraguay; Gov’t Cautious

PERU
Health Care Workers in Peru Go on Strike

PUERTO RICO
Puerto Rico needs a financial control board

URUGUAY
POLL NUMBERS!!! Uruguay election this weekend

Uruguay Leader’s Party Fights to Retain Rule After Vote
President José ‘Pepe’ Mujica popularity isn’t enough to guarantee victory for the center-left Broad Front coalition that has ruled for a decade, according to polls and political analysts.

VENEZUELA
Dakazo 2 and Technocrats

How Bad Are Things In Venezuela? It’s Rationing Food – And Importing Oil

Venezuela seizes warehouses packed with medical goods, food

The 61% Devaluation That Venezuela Told No One About

The week’s posts and podcast:
Elections: No change in Brazil, Uruguay

Friday afternoon tap dancing priests

Argentina: Creeping to the edge

Venezuela: Mileposts on the highway to hell

Cuba: NYT goes Duranty on ebola

Venezuela: Happy Halloween! Hugo Chavez M&Ms

Immigration: Obama to allow in 100,000 Haitians with no visas

At Da Tech Guy’s blog:
What may be the most consequential election of the decade

Mexico: The death of #Felina

The curious incident of the Carnival Magic in Belize UPDATED

The Synod and the Pope-A-Dope

In Silvio Canto’s podcast:
The elections in Brazil with Monica Showalter of Investor’s Business Daily.

Posts from the prior week:
In transit, again

Venezuela and the falling oil price UPDATED

Venezuela wins U.N. Council seat

Eichmann’s true nature: 2 reviews of “Eichmann Before Jerusalem: The Unexamined Life of a Mass Murderer”

Mexico: #Ayotzinapa backlash in Mexico Bronco

Could Mexico become the next Russia?



Mexico: The death of #Felina

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

faustaMy latest, Mexico: The death of #Felina, is up at Da Tech Guy Blog,

As we watch with dismay the ever-more-porous border with Mexico, is it unreasonable to be concerned about the effects of the Obama administration’s open borders policy on public safety and national security?

Mexico: #Ayotzinapa backlash in Mexico Bronco

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

The 43 students are still missing. Here are today’s headlines:

Mexican Tied to Missing Students Is Killed
Death of Benjamin Mondragón, Alleged Head of Guerreros Unidos, Comes After Protests

The alleged leader of a Mexican criminal band that prosecutors accuse of colluding with police in the disappearance of 43 college students was killed on Tuesday during a shootout with security forces, federal officials said.

The security forces had tracked Benjamin Mondragón to a house in a suburb of Cuernavaca, just south of Mexico City, where the battle took place, officials said.

The officials said Mr. Mondragón led the Guerreros Unidos gang, which they said collaborated with police in the September shooting deaths of six people and the subsequent disappearance of the college students—whom most officials presume to be dead—in Iguala, a city in Guerrero state.

The death of Mr. Mondragón, known as Benjamón, or Big Ben, came a day after teachers and students burned and vandalized parts of Guerrero Gov. Angel Aguirre’s office and the state’s local legislature, demanding the return of the missing students and the governor’s resignation.
. . . .
But the incident in Iguala is a reminder of what Mexicans call “Mexico Bronco,” or “Untamed Mexico”—a wild land rife with poverty, cronyism and violence. Entire states and hundreds of cities and towns are in the grip of drug gangs and corrupt police and city halls, security experts say. The rule of law is shaky: Fewer than 3% of homicides are solved, officials say.

Protesters Burn State Building in Southern Mexico
Students, Teachers Clash With Police as Anger Flares Over Disappearance of 43 Young People

Missing Mexico students: Iguala eyewitness account

The search continues in Mexico for 43 students who have been missing since 26 September following clashes with the police. Omar Garcia is one of the students who witnessed the deadly clashes in which six people died. Here he describes what he saw that evening and what he thinks may have happened to his 43 fellow students.
. . .
We think the municipal police took them – what we think happened is that they kept them somewhere and then, as we say, “disappeared” them – like so many thousands of others in this country who are missing.

The Twitter tag is #Ayotzinapa

Could Mexico become the next Russia?

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

In Russia, Putin is king. Paul Roderick Gregory writes that Putin’s Reaction To Sanctions Is Destroying The Economy And China Won’t Help

Things are not going well for Vladimir Putin. The price of oil and the ruble continue to fall. Top Russian officials admit that the economy is in big trouble, despite Putin’s denials. Likely presidential candidate, Hillary Clinton, has declared that Putin must be contained. Putin’s counter sanctions are making things worse. The most ominous sign, however, is that Putin is weakening the foundations on which his power is based. He is cutting off foreign investment by bailing out his friends, and he is breaking the social compact on which his KGB-Mafia state is founded.
. . .
Putin’s kleptocracy is based on the following principles of (mis)governance: 1) The state determines what is legal and what is not; there is no rule of law. 2) The state serves the interests of Putin and his inner circle, not of the people. 3) Putin’s kleptocracy uses its media monopoly to brainwash the people with Goebbels-like big lies. 4) Putin determines property rights – who owns what. 5) Disloyalty will be punished by confiscation of property, banishment, prison, or worse. Loyalists can rest easy, however. Their property is safe, or at least says their friend, Vladimir Putin.

Leon Krauze sees Russia as a cautionary tale for Mexico, and asks that Mexico’s President Must Not Ignore This Mass Grave of College Kids—or the Corruption It Represents. The mass grave refers to the 43 students missing since September 26

And then you have Guerrero, current epicenter of Mexico’s nightmare. For a while now, rival gangs have been fighting for control of the state. The result has been the usual parade of horrors: cities besieged (including Acapulco), governments infiltrated, journalists threatened, police corrupted. And death. And vengeance. The latest rearing of the beast’s head produced an atrocity: 43 college students were abducted by local policemen, reportedly under the order of both the police chief and the mayor of Iguala, a man allegedly in cahoots with organized crime (both are on the run). The whereabouts of the kidnapped students remain unknown, but authorities recently found a crude open grave filled with 28 severely burnt bodies. Some showed signs of torture. Forensics are still trying to figure out if the bodies are those of the kidnapped students. Relatives fear the worst.

Krauze points out,

Instead of trying to will reality into submission, the government should tackle Mexico’s biggest problem: corruption. Despite Peña Nieto’s penchant for structural change, his administration has failed to put in place even the most modest reform to fight the country’s deep-rooted corruption.

Updating the story yesterday, Mexico’s attorney general said that none of the 28 bodies found in a mass grave in Iguala belongs to the 43 missing students. I don’t know what’s worse: the fact that nine mass graves exist in Iguala, or that none of the students’ remains have been found.

Iguala’s mayor Jose Luis Abarca (now missing, along with his wife and the town police chief), had numerous and serious complaints of corruption filed against him, which federal authorities ignored.

The thing is, Peña Nieto’s party, the PRI (Institutional Revolutionary Party) was based, and ruled Mexico for over 70 years with impunity, on a culture built on widespread tolerance of corruption, which Krauze calls a “gigantic structure of perverse political convenience.” About the only thing preventing Mexico from a Putin-type of president was that the PRI insisted on changing presidents every six years.

When Krauze asked Peña Nieto (emphasis added)

how Peña Nieto planned to prevent Mexico from turning into Russia, especially now that billions of dollars will be in play due to the recent opening of the country’s energy sector to private investors. Peña Nieto shrugged off my concern. Corruption in Mexico “is a cultural matter,” he said, not realizing the implications of the sentence.

Until and unless Mexico tackles corruption, the country is not going to flourish, no matter what other changes the president du jour may attempt.

[Post edited for clarity]



The Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

LatinAmerARGENTINA
Argentine Government Blasts “Speculation” by Grain Exporters

Argentina Creditors’ Lawyers, Mediator to Meet
A court-appointed mediator will meet next week with lawyers representing Argentina and its holdout creditors, the mediator said Friday

BOLIVIA
Morales confident he will win Sunday’s election in all nine Bolivian districts
At an event to mark the closing of his campaign ahead of Sunday’s elections, a self-assured Evo Morales told Bolivians that he will win all over the country and will even take the opposition’s bastions of support in the east.

Bolivia’s election
Happily Evo after
A third term for a “non-stick” leader

BRAZIL
Number of Attacks in Southern Brazil State Rises to 100
The wave of violence, which has left at least three people dead and 41 buses destroyed, has spread to 31 cities in Santa Catarina, whose authorities say the attacks are ordered by a criminal gang from Argentina.


Brazil’s Election Shows How The Left Thrives On Welfare Dependency

The Key Proposals Of Brazil Presidential Hopeful Aécio Neves

Brazil Suspected Ebola Case Tests Negative
A West African man held in isolation at a Rio de Janeiro hospital on suspicion of bringing the deadly Ebola virus to South America has tested negative for the disease, the Health Ministry said Saturday.

CAYMAN ISLANDS
Former Cayman Premier Acquitted

CHILE
Experts Lower Chile’s Growth Forecast to 1.9%

COLOMBIA
Colombia Authorized Guerrilla Leader’s Trips to Cuba

Hours later, President Juan Manuel Santos said that he personally signed off on the trips, which he described as “part of the process, normal.”

Washington Post reporter: White House spin on Cartegena is “demonstrably false”

CUBA
CASTRO’S MOMUMENT
The Castro Legacy: Untold Thousands of Watery Graves

World Bank Touts Cuba’s Communist Education as Exemplary
All the Better to Indoctrinate Students, Exiles Contend

Cuban: I’d Rather Die Trying to Reach Freedom, Than Live on My Knees Living in Tyranny

ECUADOR
El escándalo uruguayo

A Raúl Sendic, candidato vicepresidencial de Uruguay, junto a Tabaré Vásquez, por el movimiento izquierdista Frente Amplio, del presidente José Mujica, le salpicó la “maldición“ del petróleo. Un cuestionado convenio de canje de crudo por derivados entre Ancap/Trafigura/Petroecuador que involucra USD 6.400 millones, empezó a pasar las primeras facturas, en medio de la campaña electoral. El escándalo ampliamente cubierto por la prensa uruguaya, hace referencia al libro Ecuador Made in China, y a una carta remitida al gobierno uruguayo y a varios legisladores de ese país.
. . .
La referida cláusula del Convenio señala que Ecuador proveerá hasta 36000 barriles diarios de crudo, sin embargo en el contrato firmado el mismo día en Montevideo, se estableció la entrega de hasta 100000 barriles diarios, con lo que se violó el Convenio. Incluir un volumen de 100000 barriles día notificaba al más ingenuo que el crudo no estaba destinado a la refinería uruguaya, cuya capacidad máxima, cuando está operativa, es de 50000 barriles día, y de un crudo diferente al ecuatoriano. Al respecto, la Contraloría abona con conclusiones que dejan sin respuesta a los autores del Acuerdo: “se contrató con Ancap, sin que existan estudios técnicos que demuestren los beneficios para el país de una contratación directa”, señala en organismo.

Feminists Weigh In for Chevron in Racketeering-Oil Pollution Case

The Women’s Legal Defense and Education Fund urged the appeals court to rule for Chevron on a highly technical but critical issue. You read that correctly: The nation’s oldest women’s-rights legal advocacy organization, a left-leaning group that helped enact the landmark 1994 Violence Against Women Act and represents victims of sexual harassment and spousal brutality, supports the multinational oil company in its struggle against a crusading lawyer who claims to represent the impoverished and oppressed.

O’Reilly Discusses WFB’s Reporting On Ecuador PR Firm Paying Liberal US Celebrities

EL SALVADOR
El Salvador tries to rein in crime with community policing

IMMIGRATION
FUSION TV LAMENTS ‘UNDOCUMENTED’ WOMEN HAVING HARD TIME GETTING ABORTIONS IN TEXAS

MEXICO
Mexico Arrests Alleged Head of Juárez Drug Cartel
Federal police arrested alleged Juárez drug cartel leader Vicente Carrillo Fuentes in the northern city of Torreón on Thursday, Mexican officials said.
His Arrest Is Seen as Symbolic Amid Police Scandal

Iguala, Mexico and police crimes

NICARAGUA
Russia ban opens opportunities to Iran, Nicaragua

PANAMA
Panama’s National Assembly Ratifies Trade Pact with Mexico

PERU
The Man Behind Peru’s Culinary Ascent
Chef Gastón Acurio Built an Empire With 44 Restaurants in 13 Countries on Ceviche, Guinea Pig and Ethnic Influences

Divide and bribe
Corruption and political fragmentation threaten Peru’s democracy

PUERTO RICO
No More Dunkin’ Donuts for Puerto Rico
Island’s Franchisee Fails to Make Payments, 18 Stores to Close

TRINIDAD TOBAGO
Trinidad and Tobago Mulls Postponing Carnival over Ebola Fears

URUGUAY
Uruguay Welcomes First Group of 42 Syrian Refugees

VENEZUELA
Wouldn’t it be better if they had done this while Maduro was speakinVenezuela: Exxon wins $1.6 billion settlementg at the UN? UN urges Venezuela to release dissenter leader Leopoldo López
The Working Group on Arbitrary Detention of the United Nations (UN) described as illegal the actions of the Venezuelan authorities in the proceedings against the political opposition leader for the events of February 12

Venezuela: a land of political killings and gang turf wars
Politician Robert Serra was murdered in his home
The grisly murder of a young politician and killing of a pro-regime militia leader in police shoot-out signal a bloody power struggle for the legacy of Hugo Chavez, writes Phillip Sherwell

Miami Venezuelans vs. Mary Landrieu

The week’s posts and podcast:
Why Venezuela should not have a seat at the UN Security Council

Could capitalism save the Arabs?

Mexico: Government paying its citizens to avoid deportation from U.S.

Venezuela: Exxon wins $1.6 billion settlement

No More Che Day

4 ISIS Terrorists Arrested in Texas

Mexico: 43 students missing since September 26

Brazil: Aécio’s plan is the economy

At Da Tech Guy Blog:
Why bother covering up the Cartagena, Colombia, prostitution scandal?

Ecuador’s “dirty hand,” and Mia Farrow’s greased palm

Podcast:
US-Latin America stories of the week.

Mexico: Government paying its citizens to avoid deportation from U.S.

Saturday, October 11th, 2014

Because it’s cheaper than to solve Mexico’s systemic problems,

Mexico Pays To Help Its Citizens Avoid Deportation From The U.S. (h/t Breitbart) for the fees under the “dreamers act”, DACA.

The Mexican Embassy in Washington, D.C., does not keep track of how many DACA applications the consulates have funded nationwide, according to Julian Escutia, head of the embassy’s consular coordination and Hispanic affairs section.

Said Julian Escutia, head of the embassy’s consular coordination and Hispanic affairs section, unironically,

“Our main objective is the well-being of our nationals wherever they are,” he said. “So what we want for them is that they are successful and really continue contributing to this country [the U.S.].”

Which is more than what the U.S. has done for Andrew Tahmooressi.

Also at NPR,
43 Missing Students, 1 Missing Mayor: Of Crime And Collusion In Mexico

The case highlights the corruption and collusion between politicians and drug traffickers in many parts of rural Mexico today.

So much for “the well-being of our nationals wherever they are.”