Archive for the ‘immigration’ Category

My latest at BlogHer

Friday, May 24th, 2013

BlogHer invited me to write about the Heritage immigration study:
The Heritage Foundation and IQ: Not a Reflection on the GOP.

IQ is a side issue; the real issue is what policies and laws the government enacts, and we should be cautious when watershed laws are rushed through.

Please read the article and leave a comment.

Immigration from south of the Mexican border

Sunday, April 28th, 2013

Hundreds of migrants sat on the roofs of railroad cars in Arriaga, in southern Mexico, waiting for the train to take them north toward the United States. Washington’s immigration overhaul would tighten border security between Mexico and the United States to stem illegal crossings. But Mexico’s other border, with Central America to the south, makes the task even harder. A growing number of Central American migrants heading to the United States cross freely under the gaze of Mexican authorities.

NYTimes report:
In Trek North, First Lure Is Mexico’s Other Line

In Washington, the biggest immigration overhaul in decades would tighten border security between Mexico and the United States to stem the flow of illegal crossings.

But there is another border making the task all the more challenging: Mexico’s porous boundary with Central America, where an increasing number of migrants heading to the United States cross freely into Mexico under the gaze of the Mexican authorities. So many Central Americans are fleeing the violence, crime and economic stagnation of their homes that American officials have encountered a tremendous spike in migrants making their way through Mexico to the United States.

American arrests of illegal crossers from countries other than Mexico — mostly from Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador — more than doubled along the southwest border of the United States last year, to 94,532 from 46,997 in 2011.

Read the rest and check out the slideshow.

The Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, April 1st, 2013

LatinAmerARGENTINA
Argentina’s Cristina Kirchner rips British rule of the Falklands in Twitter tirade

A Bit of 1984: Biometriics Used in #Argentina Today (h/t McNorman).

BRAZIL
China and Brazil sign $30bn currency swap agreement
China and Brazil have signed a currency swap deal, designed to safeguard against future global financial crises.

Deforestation in Brazil’s Amazon up 26 pct, via Gates of Vienna

Rio 2016 stadium escapes demolition
The Joao Havelange stadium, which was due to host the Rio 2016 Olympics, will not be demolished, despite structural problems that led to its closure.

CHILE
Chile ex-president Bachelet to run for re-election

Students and police clash in Chile
Thousands of Chilean students clash with police on the streets of the capital, Santiago, during a protest calling for education reforms.

COLOMBIA
Colombia Kills Leader of ELN Guerrilla Group During Military Operation, Omar,

The deceased ELN leader was a member of the guerrilla group for 17 years and was purportedly heavily involved in the group’s extortion racket and cocaine production.

CUBA
Cuban Bullies at the U.N.
By Mary Anastasia O’Grady
Cuba’s military dictatorship tries—and fails–to put the kibosh on dissident Yoani Sánchez’s press conference at the U.N.

Eating a cable: Internet access still elusive in the island – by Yoani Sánchez

Cuba Harbors and Supports Terrorists. It Will Remain on the U.S. State Sponsors of Terrorism List. End of Story.

The State of Cuba in 2013

FALKLAND ISLANDS
Barack Obama called ‘a hypocrite and a coward’ over Falklands betrayal – BBC audience applauds

IMMIGRATION
A Bleak Picture
Employment among U.S. Citizens in States Represented by Gang of Eight

Bill Whittle,

“Imagine a country where not only are the borders secured by armed guards, but once you entered the country, if you even spoke about politics — at all — if you even mentioned anything politically, you would be deported. Imagine a country where everyone is required to be tracked all the time. Where all of these immigrants are constantly monitored. Imagine where the idea of immigrants even having a word on the internal politics of a country would be enough to get them deported.”

“I can imagine a country like that. That country is Mexico.”

LATIN AMERICA
HACER’s News Highlights of the week

Latins Rally to Restore Human Rights Panel

MEXICO
Growing Population Of Muslims Calling Tijuana Home, via Gates of Vienna

Enrique Peña Nieto’s reforms
One hundred days of solidarity
(VIDEO STARTS RIGHT AWAY)

PERU
Peru intensifies currency fight

PUERTO RICO
Puerto Rico Creates Tax Shelters in Appeal to the Rich

TRINIDAD
Trinidad’s gov’t official subject of US criminal probe
National Security Minister Jack Warner is the subject of a U.S. criminal probe, a local newspaper in the twin-island nation reported.

VENEZUELA
Hugo Chavez’s Legacy of Conflict and Propaganda
What the death of Chavez means for Venezuela and the U.S.

Rest in Peace Hugo Chávez, Says a Mural in Paris Filled with Portraits of Venezuela’s Caudillo

MARK FALCOFF: VENEZUELA’S FORTHCOMING ELECTIONS

Is SICAD A Radical Change In How The Economy Is Managed??

The week’s posts:
Peru’s definitely not Cyprus

BBC’s Book of the Week: Comandante

Obama heading to Mexico and Costa Rica

Meanwhile, over in the country with the strictest gun control laws in our hemisphere,

Venezuela: Maduro vs Lechuga

The fighting cholitas hit the mainstream

Hezbollah agent issued Venezuelan diplomatic passport

Argentina: Feed a regime, starve a media


In Rick Moran’s podcast

Tuesday, March 26th, 2013

live now, talking about Immigration reform: Amnesty or common sense?

We need more of these: Foreign citizens making big investments in U.S. in exchange for green cards

Sunday, March 24th, 2013

At the WaPo, Foreign citizens making big investments in U.S. in exchange for green cards

The EB-5 program is booming in popularity, driven largely by a struggling U.S. economy in which developers are searching for new sources of capital. It is also fueled by rising demand from foreigners looking for access to U.S. schools, safe investment in U.S. projects and — in the case of China, where most of the investors are from — greater freedom.

The program has broad bipartisan support in Congress, and key senators who are negotiating an overhaul of the immigration system have said they are leaning toward expanding visa programs that provide an immediate boost to the economy.

Since the EB-5 program began in 1992, more than 29,000 people have received visas, foreigners have invested more than $6.8 billion and 50,000 American jobs have been created, U.S. officials said.

IF (big “if”) the government can carry out this program in such a way that real investors are bringing thriving businesses, there’s only thing to say:

More cowbell!

In other immigration news,
Texas taxpayers spent at least $250 million last year in state prison and health care costs for illegal immigrants.

Latino demographics: Integration is the key factor

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

I’ve always felt that immigration’s problems are related to assimilation. Here’s what’s in the news today,

Hispanics Extend Reach Beyond Enclaves
South Americans and Others Found to Live in More Integrated Areas Than Mexicans in a Study of Latinos’ Demographics

South Americans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans are settling among the existing U.S. population more readily than Mexicans, the nation’s largest Hispanic group, a trend with implications for politics, the economy and other areas of daily life.

South Americans, including Argentines and Venezuelans, have the highest levels of education and are the least segregated from other ethnic groups in the U.S., even if they are more recent arrivals, according to the study.

Back in 2006 I wrote of The “Hispanic” Mirage

There are two dozen Spanish-speaking countries in the Americas. Each one of those countries is as unique as countries can be. Their histories are different, their customs, foods, music, traditions, and even their slang, are different. Every “Hispanic” country has peoples of every ethnic origin, race, religion, economic status, family size, educational background, physical size and build, level of work skills, and intellectual and mental ability. You will find this to be the case even more dramatically in all cities with large ports, and in resort areas. A lot of people from other countries who come for trade and pleasure return to settle permanently in those areas.

You want diversity? Let’s look at real diversity:

There are Peruvians of Japanese ancestry (and one of them became president of Peru). There are Chinese Cubans. There are English Puerto Ricans (my mother’s high school teacher’s family, for instance) – and Puerto Rico has a significant illegal alien problem from people from adjacent islands. There are German Venezuelans. There are Irish Argentinians. The Africans that were brought to Latin America from the slave trade are not all from the same areas of Africa and did not follow the same traditions. Even among the native peoples, the Peruvian Quechua are not the Chilean Mapuche who are not the Mayans of Apocalypto.

Within countries there are significant differences. For example: Among the millions of legal and illegal immigrants to the USA, there are hundreds of native associations, particularly in the South West. Do a google search for asociacion Oaxaca and you’ll find 966,000 results. The Mexicans who come from Oaxaca will tell you that they are not the Mexicans from the capital (Distrito Federal), and that they enjoy getting together with their friends from their corner of the old country, hence, the asociaciones Oaxaqueñas.

The article recognizes this fact,

Four decades ago, the federal government identified as “Hispanic” the surging mass of people with origins in Latin America and the Caribbean. They are a multiracial, multiethnic and multicultural lot: Argentines often descend from white Italians and Spaniards; Dominicans are often black. Politicians and marketers who wish to reach out to Hispanics need to be aware of the major differences among them, experts say, because they aren’t a monolith.

“Shared language is important, but it’s also important to be aware that most Mexicans are not immigrants, South Americans have relatively high education and income, and that many of the least-advantaged Hispanics are the rapidly growing number of immigrants from Central America,” Mr. Logan said.

60% of all Latinos in the USA are Mexican. Geography plays a part, too

Distance from country of origin plays a role. South Americans are less likely to be economic migrants—they often are in the U.S. to further their education or flee unrest—than Mexican and Central Americans, who usually reach the U.S. by land.

And, as a final word, WSJ commenter Giovanny Jose Arguello,

Education is the most important factor for integration, elimination of language barrier and sharing a common culture, American culture.

Sharing a common culture in your new home: a culture that you have more in common with than you might have with other Latinos.

The dead Hugo Chavez Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, March 11th, 2013

LatinAmerWelcome to the Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean. The top story in our hemisphere this week: the announcement of Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez’s death. While the government has announced a presidential election for April 14th, don’t expect chavismo to give up power anytime soon.

Mary O’Grady writes on Chávez ‘The Redeemer’
Even as his rule dimmed their future, Venezuela’s poor clung to the belief that he cared for them.

The cult of adoration is now under way, which fills a need peculiar to Latin America, as Enrique Krauze explains,

In Latin America the need to turn politicians into secular saints is due to the distrust many feel for the region’s weak institutions and a worship for so-called men on horseback—heroes who come to the nation’s rescue, said Mr. Krauze. The region’s deep Catholic tradition of anointing and then venerating saints is also an important factor, he said.

It could never happen here, could it?

ARGENTINA
Argentine court convicts ex-leader Menem
An appeals court in Buenos Aires convicts ex-President Carlos Menem of illegally selling 6,500 tonnes of arms to Croatia and Ecuador during the 1990s.

BRAZIL
Brazil, Where a Judge Made $361,500 in a Month, Fumes Over Pay
Exploiting generous benefits and loopholes, some public sector employees are earning more than $260,000 in a year.

When Congress finally decided in 2012 to allow people to obtain the salary information of its employees, it also required them to find the name of each employee and submit it online. In other words, if someone wanted the information on the legislature’s 25,000-strong work force, then that person had to independently identify them and submit 25,000 separate online requests.

If only it were that easy here in São Paulo. One clerk at the state’s high court, Ivete Sartório, was reportedly paid about $115,000 after convincing her superiors that she should be compensated for not taking leaves of absence. But when asked recently about her wages, a spokesman for the court, Rômulo Pordeus, said that Ms. Sartório’s “matriculation number” was needed to request the information.

When asked how any curious taxpayer could get that number, he replied that it was in Ms. Sartório’s possession, and that he did not want to bother her about it.

CHILE
World’s Largest Ground-Based Telescope Array Opens in Chile Soon: The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

COLOMBIA
Colombian ELN rebels free held German Breuer brothers
Two German nationals held hostage in Colombia since early November have been freed, the International Committee of the Red Cross says.

CUBA
Cuba dissident ‘forced off road’ to death

How Castro Defines Gender Equality

FALKLAND ISLANDS
Land Rovers and Airplanes Ready as Falklands Votes on U.K. Ties

HONDURAS
Central America
Out of control
In the first of two reports on the threat of rampant violence to Central America’s small republics, we look at the risk of Honduras becoming a failed state

LATIN AMERICA
WATCHING THE LINE
Long Border, Endless Struggle

MEXICO
Power in Mexico
“The Teacher” in detention
Enrique Peña Nieto’s government has arrested a powerful union leader. Is this the start of something?

MEMO FROM MEXICO CITY
Unabated Violence Poses Challenge to Mexico’s New Anticrime Program
Recent violence, including gang rapes and the killing of police officers, has put pressure on Mexico’s new leader as he rolls out a less militaristic crime prevention initiative
.

PERU
Peru’s economy likely expanded 6-7 pct in January – cenbank

Peru Keeps 4.25% Rate as CPI Slows Amid Stable GrowthQ
Peru kept borrowing costs unchanged for a 22nd consecutive month as policy makers expect inflation to converge to the mid-point of their target and economic growth to exceed 6 percent.

PUERTO RICO
Ex-Governor of Puerto Rico: GOP Must Lead on Immigration Reform

VENEZUELA
What Is The U.S. Doing At Chavez’s Funeral?

Not playing nice with the dead: Chavez main crimes

The Post Chávez Era Begins

WSJ timeline: Hugo Chávez: From Coup Leader to President
Born Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías on July 28, 1954, in a small farming village in Sabaneta, he was first elected president in 1998, six years after engineering a failed military coup.

Contrary To What Jimmy Carter Says, Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez Was No Friend Of The Poor

Rev. Jesse Jackson Attends Hugo Chavez Funeral

The wild card in Venezuela: Armed Chavistas

PARTE 2: ¿CHÁVEZ: LA MUERTE DE UN REVOLUCIONARIO, UN SOCIALISTA…UN DICTADOR?

Iran Leader Lambasted for Tribute to Chávez

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s lionization of his Venezuelan friend Hugo Chávez caused a political firestorm in the Islamic Republic, as doubts arose over whether the two countries could carry on their tight alliance now that Mr. Chávez is dead.

Chavez failed Venezuela: Column
Given the unqualified failure of his socialist experiment, dying young was probably the best thing Hugo Chavez could have done for his country.

Venezuela after Chávez
Now for the reckoning
After 14 years of oil-fuelled autocracy, Hugo Chávez’s successors will struggle to keep the Bolivarian revolution on the road

Venezuela Opposition Faces Hurdles
Chávez’s Heir Apparent Seen Riding Late Leader’s Coattails to Victory in Election Expected Next Month

The nature of Hugo Chávez’s appeal on the American left?

Chavez: Death of a tyrant

The week’s posts and podcast:
SNL Hugo’s Candle in the Wind

What’s left of Latin America’s Left?

Hugo Chavez’s funeral

Chavez aftermath

UPDATE: CHAVEZ IS DEAD

How Bob Menendez sponsored a bill that would have benefited his biggest political donor
Podcast:
US-Latin America this week: The death of Chavez

TB at the border, and drug violence

Saturday, March 9th, 2013

Risk of Deadly TB Exposure Grows Along U.S.-Mexico Border

Officials say that when drug-resistant cases show up in the U.S., there is often a Mexico connection. Of San Diego’s 14 multidrug-resistant TB cases between 2007 and 2011, half were either from Mexico or had a Mexico link based on the particular strain of the disease, said Kathleen Moser of the county’s Health & Human Services Agency, which sees many patients who live and work on both sides of the border.

Part of the problem, of course, is that Mexico’s rate of TB infection is much higher—in some cases 10 times higher. The resistant strains begin to breed, experts say, when doctors there give patients similar drug regimens over and over. Other times, patients who aren’t supervised closely abandon treatment before they are cured.

It’s worse because of the Mexican drug violence:

Funding isn’t the only issue. As a key part of prevention efforts, U.S. experts have regularly crossed the border in California and Texas to keep tabs on and help patients directly. But drug-related violence along parts of the U.S.-Mexico border has shot up, forcing workers to consult only from the U.S. side. Among them is Barbara Seaworth, the medical director of a TB center in San Antonio, who stopped a few years ago after making the trips for nearly 20 years.

Compounding the problem: Mexico lacks enough health workers to offer directly observed therapy to every patient.

THIS I could support: Entrepreneur visas

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

A New Push for Entrepreneur Visas

The Startup Act 3.0, a bipartisan Senate bill expected to be introduced this week, aims to get 75,000 new “entrepreneur visas” every year to founders who raise $100,000 for new ventures that hire at least two employees within a year and at least five in the following three years.

The measure also would create 50,000 visas per year for foreign students who graduate from U.S. universities with advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering or mathematics, and spend at least five years pursuing careers in those fields.

But those are not the kind of immigrants the Dems want:

Last November, the House passed a stand-alone bill that would have given visas to immigrants in high-tech fields. Mr. Obama opposed the bill, and the White House said at the time it “does not support narrowly tailored proposals that do not meet the president’s long-term objectives with respect to comprehensive immigration reform.”

Obama’s SOTU’S call for “comprehensive immigration reform” is not going to add any jobs to the economy, and it won’t create opportunity for Americans, nor would it provide incentives for integration and assimilation.

Bringing in highly-skilled entrepreneurs who will hire Americans (born or naturalized) will.


Venezuelan immigration to the USA quadrupled over the past 15 years

Friday, November 23rd, 2012


Venezuelan journalist Carlos Subero researched immigration patterns from Venezuela to the US since 1997 and found that it has surged from 2,500 to 10,000 per year. This reverses the trend of the 1950s, when Venezuela received immigrants from Spain, Italy and Portugal.

Subero, who blogs at Carlossubero’s blog, also found that every forty minutes a Venezuelan obtains a US resident visa, and that the majority of Venezuelan immigrants to the US are middle class or upper-middle class. One in every six is in the traditional professions, a real “brain drain” in Venezuela.

As you can see on the graph below, immigration jumped to the 10,000/yr mark on 2005, when Hugo Chávez announced the Salto Adelante, hacia la construcción del Socialismo del Siglo XXI (Leap Forward, towards building 21st Century Socialism) and began expropriating private lands and businesses:

Personal safety, economic reasons, and politics are the top reasons for immigrating to the USA. Subero also found,

  • Whole families are immigrating – the parents seek better lives for their children
  • Venezuelans are not interested in entering the USA illegally
  • 40% of immigrants in 2009 were sponsored by next-of-kin who is an American citizen
  • Most seek American citizenship.

Subero’s book, in Spanish, is available through Amazon.

Here’s a brief interview, also in Spanish,

Cross-posted at Liberty Unyielding.