Archive for the ‘illegal immigration’ Category

Latino demographics: Integration is the key factor

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013

I’ve always felt that immigration’s problems are related to assimilation. Here’s what’s in the news today,

Hispanics Extend Reach Beyond Enclaves
South Americans and Others Found to Live in More Integrated Areas Than Mexicans in a Study of Latinos’ Demographics

South Americans, Puerto Ricans and Cubans are settling among the existing U.S. population more readily than Mexicans, the nation’s largest Hispanic group, a trend with implications for politics, the economy and other areas of daily life.

South Americans, including Argentines and Venezuelans, have the highest levels of education and are the least segregated from other ethnic groups in the U.S., even if they are more recent arrivals, according to the study.

Back in 2006 I wrote of The “Hispanic” Mirage

There are two dozen Spanish-speaking countries in the Americas. Each one of those countries is as unique as countries can be. Their histories are different, their customs, foods, music, traditions, and even their slang, are different. Every “Hispanic” country has peoples of every ethnic origin, race, religion, economic status, family size, educational background, physical size and build, level of work skills, and intellectual and mental ability. You will find this to be the case even more dramatically in all cities with large ports, and in resort areas. A lot of people from other countries who come for trade and pleasure return to settle permanently in those areas.

You want diversity? Let’s look at real diversity:

There are Peruvians of Japanese ancestry (and one of them became president of Peru). There are Chinese Cubans. There are English Puerto Ricans (my mother’s high school teacher’s family, for instance) – and Puerto Rico has a significant illegal alien problem from people from adjacent islands. There are German Venezuelans. There are Irish Argentinians. The Africans that were brought to Latin America from the slave trade are not all from the same areas of Africa and did not follow the same traditions. Even among the native peoples, the Peruvian Quechua are not the Chilean Mapuche who are not the Mayans of Apocalypto.

Within countries there are significant differences. For example: Among the millions of legal and illegal immigrants to the USA, there are hundreds of native associations, particularly in the South West. Do a google search for asociacion Oaxaca and you’ll find 966,000 results. The Mexicans who come from Oaxaca will tell you that they are not the Mexicans from the capital (Distrito Federal), and that they enjoy getting together with their friends from their corner of the old country, hence, the asociaciones Oaxaqueñas.

The article recognizes this fact,

Four decades ago, the federal government identified as “Hispanic” the surging mass of people with origins in Latin America and the Caribbean. They are a multiracial, multiethnic and multicultural lot: Argentines often descend from white Italians and Spaniards; Dominicans are often black. Politicians and marketers who wish to reach out to Hispanics need to be aware of the major differences among them, experts say, because they aren’t a monolith.

“Shared language is important, but it’s also important to be aware that most Mexicans are not immigrants, South Americans have relatively high education and income, and that many of the least-advantaged Hispanics are the rapidly growing number of immigrants from Central America,” Mr. Logan said.

60% of all Latinos in the USA are Mexican. Geography plays a part, too

Distance from country of origin plays a role. South Americans are less likely to be economic migrants—they often are in the U.S. to further their education or flee unrest—than Mexican and Central Americans, who usually reach the U.S. by land.

And, as a final word, WSJ commenter Giovanny Jose Arguello,

Education is the most important factor for integration, elimination of language barrier and sharing a common culture, American culture.

Sharing a common culture in your new home: a culture that you have more in common with than you might have with other Latinos.

The dead Hugo Chavez Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, March 11th, 2013

LatinAmerWelcome to the Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean. The top story in our hemisphere this week: the announcement of Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chavez’s death. While the government has announced a presidential election for April 14th, don’t expect chavismo to give up power anytime soon.

Mary O’Grady writes on Chávez ‘The Redeemer’
Even as his rule dimmed their future, Venezuela’s poor clung to the belief that he cared for them.

The cult of adoration is now under way, which fills a need peculiar to Latin America, as Enrique Krauze explains,

In Latin America the need to turn politicians into secular saints is due to the distrust many feel for the region’s weak institutions and a worship for so-called men on horseback—heroes who come to the nation’s rescue, said Mr. Krauze. The region’s deep Catholic tradition of anointing and then venerating saints is also an important factor, he said.

It could never happen here, could it?

ARGENTINA
Argentine court convicts ex-leader Menem
An appeals court in Buenos Aires convicts ex-President Carlos Menem of illegally selling 6,500 tonnes of arms to Croatia and Ecuador during the 1990s.

BRAZIL
Brazil, Where a Judge Made $361,500 in a Month, Fumes Over Pay
Exploiting generous benefits and loopholes, some public sector employees are earning more than $260,000 in a year.

When Congress finally decided in 2012 to allow people to obtain the salary information of its employees, it also required them to find the name of each employee and submit it online. In other words, if someone wanted the information on the legislature’s 25,000-strong work force, then that person had to independently identify them and submit 25,000 separate online requests.

If only it were that easy here in São Paulo. One clerk at the state’s high court, Ivete Sartório, was reportedly paid about $115,000 after convincing her superiors that she should be compensated for not taking leaves of absence. But when asked recently about her wages, a spokesman for the court, Rômulo Pordeus, said that Ms. Sartório’s “matriculation number” was needed to request the information.

When asked how any curious taxpayer could get that number, he replied that it was in Ms. Sartório’s possession, and that he did not want to bother her about it.

CHILE
World’s Largest Ground-Based Telescope Array Opens in Chile Soon: The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA).

COLOMBIA
Colombian ELN rebels free held German Breuer brothers
Two German nationals held hostage in Colombia since early November have been freed, the International Committee of the Red Cross says.

CUBA
Cuba dissident ‘forced off road’ to death

How Castro Defines Gender Equality

FALKLAND ISLANDS
Land Rovers and Airplanes Ready as Falklands Votes on U.K. Ties

HONDURAS
Central America
Out of control
In the first of two reports on the threat of rampant violence to Central America’s small republics, we look at the risk of Honduras becoming a failed state

LATIN AMERICA
WATCHING THE LINE
Long Border, Endless Struggle

MEXICO
Power in Mexico
“The Teacher” in detention
Enrique Peña Nieto’s government has arrested a powerful union leader. Is this the start of something?

MEMO FROM MEXICO CITY
Unabated Violence Poses Challenge to Mexico’s New Anticrime Program
Recent violence, including gang rapes and the killing of police officers, has put pressure on Mexico’s new leader as he rolls out a less militaristic crime prevention initiative
.

PERU
Peru’s economy likely expanded 6-7 pct in January – cenbank

Peru Keeps 4.25% Rate as CPI Slows Amid Stable GrowthQ
Peru kept borrowing costs unchanged for a 22nd consecutive month as policy makers expect inflation to converge to the mid-point of their target and economic growth to exceed 6 percent.

PUERTO RICO
Ex-Governor of Puerto Rico: GOP Must Lead on Immigration Reform

VENEZUELA
What Is The U.S. Doing At Chavez’s Funeral?

Not playing nice with the dead: Chavez main crimes

The Post Chávez Era Begins

WSJ timeline: Hugo Chávez: From Coup Leader to President
Born Hugo Rafael Chávez Frías on July 28, 1954, in a small farming village in Sabaneta, he was first elected president in 1998, six years after engineering a failed military coup.

Contrary To What Jimmy Carter Says, Venezuela’s Hugo Chavez Was No Friend Of The Poor

Rev. Jesse Jackson Attends Hugo Chavez Funeral

The wild card in Venezuela: Armed Chavistas

PARTE 2: ¿CHÁVEZ: LA MUERTE DE UN REVOLUCIONARIO, UN SOCIALISTA…UN DICTADOR?

Iran Leader Lambasted for Tribute to Chávez

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s lionization of his Venezuelan friend Hugo Chávez caused a political firestorm in the Islamic Republic, as doubts arose over whether the two countries could carry on their tight alliance now that Mr. Chávez is dead.

Chavez failed Venezuela: Column
Given the unqualified failure of his socialist experiment, dying young was probably the best thing Hugo Chavez could have done for his country.

Venezuela after Chávez
Now for the reckoning
After 14 years of oil-fuelled autocracy, Hugo Chávez’s successors will struggle to keep the Bolivarian revolution on the road

Venezuela Opposition Faces Hurdles
Chávez’s Heir Apparent Seen Riding Late Leader’s Coattails to Victory in Election Expected Next Month

The nature of Hugo Chávez’s appeal on the American left?

Chavez: Death of a tyrant

The week’s posts and podcast:
SNL Hugo’s Candle in the Wind

What’s left of Latin America’s Left?

Hugo Chavez’s funeral

Chavez aftermath

UPDATE: CHAVEZ IS DEAD

How Bob Menendez sponsored a bill that would have benefited his biggest political donor
Podcast:
US-Latin America this week: The death of Chavez

TB at the border, and drug violence

Saturday, March 9th, 2013

Risk of Deadly TB Exposure Grows Along U.S.-Mexico Border

Officials say that when drug-resistant cases show up in the U.S., there is often a Mexico connection. Of San Diego’s 14 multidrug-resistant TB cases between 2007 and 2011, half were either from Mexico or had a Mexico link based on the particular strain of the disease, said Kathleen Moser of the county’s Health & Human Services Agency, which sees many patients who live and work on both sides of the border.

Part of the problem, of course, is that Mexico’s rate of TB infection is much higher—in some cases 10 times higher. The resistant strains begin to breed, experts say, when doctors there give patients similar drug regimens over and over. Other times, patients who aren’t supervised closely abandon treatment before they are cured.

It’s worse because of the Mexican drug violence:

Funding isn’t the only issue. As a key part of prevention efforts, U.S. experts have regularly crossed the border in California and Texas to keep tabs on and help patients directly. But drug-related violence along parts of the U.S.-Mexico border has shot up, forcing workers to consult only from the U.S. side. Among them is Barbara Seaworth, the medical director of a TB center in San Antonio, who stopped a few years ago after making the trips for nearly 20 years.

Compounding the problem: Mexico lacks enough health workers to offer directly observed therapy to every patient.

THIS I could support: Entrepreneur visas

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

A New Push for Entrepreneur Visas

The Startup Act 3.0, a bipartisan Senate bill expected to be introduced this week, aims to get 75,000 new “entrepreneur visas” every year to founders who raise $100,000 for new ventures that hire at least two employees within a year and at least five in the following three years.

The measure also would create 50,000 visas per year for foreign students who graduate from U.S. universities with advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering or mathematics, and spend at least five years pursuing careers in those fields.

But those are not the kind of immigrants the Dems want:

Last November, the House passed a stand-alone bill that would have given visas to immigrants in high-tech fields. Mr. Obama opposed the bill, and the White House said at the time it “does not support narrowly tailored proposals that do not meet the president’s long-term objectives with respect to comprehensive immigration reform.”

Obama’s SOTU’S call for “comprehensive immigration reform” is not going to add any jobs to the economy, and it won’t create opportunity for Americans, nor would it provide incentives for integration and assimilation.

Bringing in highly-skilled entrepreneurs who will hire Americans (born or naturalized) will.


Venezuelan immigration to the USA quadrupled over the past 15 years

Friday, November 23rd, 2012


Venezuelan journalist Carlos Subero researched immigration patterns from Venezuela to the US since 1997 and found that it has surged from 2,500 to 10,000 per year. This reverses the trend of the 1950s, when Venezuela received immigrants from Spain, Italy and Portugal.

Subero, who blogs at Carlossubero’s blog, also found that every forty minutes a Venezuelan obtains a US resident visa, and that the majority of Venezuelan immigrants to the US are middle class or upper-middle class. One in every six is in the traditional professions, a real “brain drain” in Venezuela.

As you can see on the graph below, immigration jumped to the 10,000/yr mark on 2005, when Hugo Chávez announced the Salto Adelante, hacia la construcción del Socialismo del Siglo XXI (Leap Forward, towards building 21st Century Socialism) and began expropriating private lands and businesses:

Personal safety, economic reasons, and politics are the top reasons for immigrating to the USA. Subero also found,

  • Whole families are immigrating – the parents seek better lives for their children
  • Venezuelans are not interested in entering the USA illegally
  • 40% of immigrants in 2009 were sponsored by next-of-kin who is an American citizen
  • Most seek American citizenship.

Subero’s book, in Spanish, is available through Amazon.

Here’s a brief interview, also in Spanish,

Cross-posted at Liberty Unyielding.

The Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, August 20th, 2012

ARGENTINA
Enter the Food Chain

BRAZIL
A moment of truth for Dilma
The president needs to do more to tackle the “Brazil cost”

Rio de Janeiro’s Olympics
The countdown starts
Compare and contrast with London

CUBA
200 Political Arrests in Just Two Weeks

A Graduate of my ‘Commie’ High School Goes to Cuba and Sees Paradise, or How One’s Education Can Warp You for Life, via Ed Driscoll.

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Spanish firm says Dominican gov’t seized assets

ECUADOR
Wikileaks’ Assange and Ecuador’s Correa: Made for Each Other

Julian Assange ‘will be given asylum in Ecuador’
Julian Assange is expected to be granted asylum in Ecuador by President Rafael Correa, it has been reported.

EL SALVADOR
El Salvador’s VP Campaigns for Votes in N.Y.
A politician who celebrated the 9/11 attacks on the U.S. gets the ‘key’ to Long Island’s Nassau County

LATIN AMERICA
Silent Running
Russian attack submarine sailed in Gulf of Mexico undetected for weeks, U.S. officials say

MEXICO
Mexico: Criminal Leader Found Dead

In Mexico’s murder city, the war appears over

PUERTO RICO
Puerto Rico Votes to Amend Constitution

Puerto Rico plans to vote on a two-part referendum Sunday that could see the island amend its constitution for the first time in nearly half a century.
The referendum would reduce the size of the U.S. territory’s government by almost 30 percent as a cost-cutting measure, and would give judges the right to deny bail in certain murder cases. Puerto Rico currently is the only place in the Western hemisphere where all suspects, including those charged with rape and murder, are entitled to bail.

Religious Left Infatuation with Puerto Rican Terror

VENEZUELA
My dog sabotaged my homework

Is Obama Protecting Hugo Chavez?

Venezuela: Law regulating leases wreaks havoc on housing market

The week’s posts:
Puerto Rico says “No”

Puerto Rico referendum: Live coverage

Yoani Sanchez on Assange’s asylum

Chavez insists the “mercenary” is real

This morning’s no-surprise news: Corzine and Assange UPDATE

Seals vs. El Chapo?

Willful blindness: Lonely Planet and Rough Guides


A passing thought:

Thursday, August 16th, 2012

A record number of people were deported from the United States last year, and now the same administration changed the law by executive action because it is politically useful, so that Illegal Immigrants Flock to Youth Program.

What could go wrong?

In time for the election, work permits to younger illegal immigrants

Friday, June 15th, 2012

U.S. to Stop Deporting Some Illegal Immigrants

Under the administration plan, illegal immigrants will be immune from deportation if they were brought to the U.S. before they turned 16 and are younger than 30, have been in the country for at least five continuous years, have no criminal history, graduated from a U.S. high school or earned an equivalent degree, or served in the military. They also can apply for a work permit that will be good for two years with no limits on how many times it can be renewed.

Hmmm… work permit + permanent address = driver’s license => voter registration => non-citizens voting?

Nah, I must be misjudging.

UPDATE,
On DREAM order, Obama short circuits consensus for short term political gain

The benefits to Obama are obvious: He undercuts Marco Rubio’s efforts to accomplish this, you know, via the democratic legislative process. And Obama also gets to score political points with a growing voting bloc — just in time for his re-election efforts.

But the real consequences have little to do with politics. As someone who opposed the Arizona law — and has supported Rubio’s DREAM ACT — I am convinced that America needs to have a serious national discussion about immigration reform. Short-circuiting the legislative process deprives us of that organic discussion. It also guarantees there will be no bipartisan consensus. Perhaps Rubio could have persuaded more conservatives to back common sense reforms? The water is now poisoned. Obama — for transparently political purposes — has made sure that conservatives and Republicans will feel slighted and kept out of the loop.

That’s because they have been.

The downside, of course, is that this does nothing to heal this nation, nothing to bring us together, and only serves as a short-term solution for immigrants when a long-term solution — one based on consensus, not political opportunism — was needed.

The Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, May 14th, 2012

LatinAmerARGENTINA
Argentina as No Claims-Nation Revealed in Repsol Losses: Energy

Repsol YPF SA (REP), the Spanish oil explorer seeking $10.5 billion from Argentina for seizing its assets, will line up behind companies from Exxon Mobil Corp. to Unisys Corp. yet to be repaid by the most-sued nation on earth.

There are 26 cases pending against Argentina, more than any other country, at the World Bank’s International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes in Washington, the principal arbitration court for claims against sovereign countries. So far, it has refused to pay any of the tribunal’s judgments, according to a Bank of America Merrill Lynch economists’ report.

Argentina’s state-owned firms
So far, not so good
Can YPF avoid the grim fate of other nationalised companies?

BOLIVIA
Bases militares venezolanas: Entrevista a la Diputada Norma Pierola

CHILE
Chile charges suspect with Japanese astronomer murder
A Chilean man has been charged with the murder of Japanese astronomer Koichiro Morita in Santiago earlier this week.

CUBA
Smile, You’re on Candid Camera.

Getting Ready for Life after Castro
Managing the transition to a democratic Cuba: A user’s guide.

More Red Than Cross

ECUADOR
Ecuador seeks answer to riddle of Inca emperor’s tomb

Chevron’s Ecuador Morass
The U.S. oil company charges that the $18 billion judgment against it was secured by fraud.

UPDATE:
MUST-WATCH VIDEO,


EL SALVADOR
Central America’s gangs
A meeting of the maras
Precarious truces between gangs have lowered the murder rate in two of the world’s most violent countries—but for how long?

GUATEMALA
End of times not quite here yet: Mayan art and calendar at Xultun stun archaeologists

“The ancient Maya predicted the world would continue, that 7,000 years from now, things would be exactly like this,” he said.

MEXICO
Maps Show 330 Illegal Aliens Crossing Ariz. Border in One Night in March, Including Ultralight Incursion

Forty-nine headless corpses found in Mexico

Mexico’s presidential election
Political lucha libre

Mexico’s leading presidential candidate is handsome, popular and still a mystery

PERU
‘Mutated’ Shining Path Resurfaces in Peru

Peru ministers resign over Shining Path rebel clashes
Peru’s interior and defence ministers have resigned in the face of a public outcry over a failed security operation against Shining Path rebels.

PUERTO RICO
Puerto Rico Plans to Stop Deficit Borrowing by Fiscal 2014

Puerto Rico plans to offer free Web connections at dozens of centers and public plazas

VENEZUELA
Venezuela’s narcostate

Venezuelan politics
A modest concession to reality
, but the weird news continue: Venezuela crossword Chavez assassination plot denied
A Venezuelan crossword compiler has been questioned by intelligence agents after being accused of hiding a coded assassination message in a puzzle.

Venezuela analysts cast doubt on presidential election
Venezuelan analysts in Miami said the Hugo Chávez administration is casting doubts about this year’s presidential election.

Watching Some “Strategic” Companies In Bolivarian Venezuela

The week’s posts:
Saturday tango: CNN version

Cuban slave labor used to build Ikea furniture in the 1980s

The History of Ernesto Che Guevara – A Short Story

Argentina’s Olympic gaffe

Mexico: The boob tube UPDATED with VIDEO

In Defense of Marco Rubio’s Story of His Family’s Exile


The Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, April 30th, 2012

LatinAmerARGENTINA
S&P downgrades Argentina’s outlook after YPF deal, H/T Gates of Vienna.

Kirchner Aide Pushed Her to Take Over Oil Firm

BARBADOS
Caribbean aviation
Red in the face

BRAZIL
Brazil sex worker may sue U.S. embassy over injuries

BTG Pactual goes public
Back to basics
A purist pay scheme at Brazil’s high-flying investment bank

COLOMBIA
Colombia’s top diplomat demands apology from President Obama for Secret Service hooker scandal
“It is necessary, and I want to hear it from the White House,’ says Gabriel Silva

Prostitution in Colombia
Not the kind of press they were after

The Colombian-Venezuelan border
Pick your poison
Drug gangs now dominate where guerrillas once reigned

Panetta: Iranian influence in South America akin to ‘expanding terrorism’, via Legal Insurrection.

Journalist missing as Farc attacks Colombia drugs raid
A French journalist is missing after Farc rebels killed four soldiers trying to destroy cocaine laboratories.
via BadBlue.

ECUADOR
Ecuador should scrap new media bill, draft new one

HAITI
The UN in Haiti
First, do no harm
Foreign peacekeepers have worn out their welcome. How can they be held accountable for their actions?

MEXICO
Guadalajara’s Bosque de la Primavera

MMFA’S RESPONSE TO ‘FAST AND FURIOUS’ PLAYS FAST AND LOOSE WITH FACTS

Young men in Mexico say the US no longer offers them a better future
Seismic shifts in immigration and demographics leave towns full of young men who once would have dreamed of the US
, H/T Gates of Vienna.

Mexican immigration
Low tide

Walmart
Walmart’s Mexican morass
The world’s biggest retailer is sent reeling by allegations of bribery

EL SALVADOR
EXCLUSIVE: New Secret Service scandal centers on strippers, prostitutes in El Salvador
U.S. Secret Service agents brag they routinely use third-world prostitutes while conducting out-of-country security detail for Presidential visits

LATIN AMERICA
Populists, centrists square off in South America’s leadership divide
Argentina, along with Venezuela Ecuador, Bolivia and Nicaragua, is part of a movement to centralize power in the executive, taking greater control of courts and the media. On the opposite end are Colombia, Chile, Mexico, Peru and Uruguay, which are led by centrist presidents using orthodox economic policies attuned to social needs

PANAMA
Panama denies Lavitola corruption allegations
Berlusconi aide suspected of illegal prison contracts, bribes

PUERTO RICO
Puerto Rico’s Growing Voter Fraud Scandal

VENEZUELA
Venezuela’s judiciary
Whistle-blown
An impeached judge says the courts are subservient and corrupt

Eladio Aponte’s Plan B

The week’s posts:
Obama got Osama but not much else
Venezuela: Chavez giveth, Chavez taketh away
Hugo Chavez and the singing judge
More Mexicans returning to Mx than coming to USA, UPDATED

At Real Clear World,
Bolivia: Venezuela Has Five Military Bases in the Country