Archive for the ‘FARC’ Category

Colombia: The FARC borrow a page from Iran and Cuba

Tuesday, October 6th, 2015

The Obama administration agreed to the Cuba deal, and to the Iran deal. Neither Cuba nor Iran ceded an inch.

The FARC are paying attention: Mary O’Grady writes about the agreement that has yet to be made public,
Colombia’s Peace Deal Comes Apart. Soon after President Santos hailed the agreement at the U.N., the FARC weighed in.

In a dramatic speech at the United Nations General Assembly on Tuesday, Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos announced that his government is on track to soon sign an agreement with the Colombian organized-crime syndicate FARC, bringing hostilities to an end. “The time of peace” is near, he solemnly predicted.

Not so fast, the FARC shot back that very same day. Its leaders issued a six-point document objecting to claims made by the Santos negotiating team in Havana about the status of the talks, and what has been agreed upon.

Santos refuses to allow a referendum anyway, but

The FARC, on the other hand, understands that it has all the leverage over Mr. Santos it needs. He has staked his legacy on a deal and hungers for the international recognition a signed agreement would bring. The stakes are even higher after the show in New York, in which Mr. Santos practically promised that he would deliver a complete final agreement in six months’ time. Colombia’s president must have studied the art of negotiation with the team President Obama sent to deal with Iran.

The FARC refuse to pay reparations to its victims, to disarm,

to confine its troops in any way or restrict the liberty of those who admit guilt

The FARC also demand to have a role in choosing the Special Jurisdiction for Peace judges.

Again, the accord has not been released to the public.

Alvaro Uribe tweets,
According to FARC, the justice accord is now Constitutional Reform as per Geneva Protocol.”

A candidate in Colombia’s October 25 elections representing former President Alvaro Uribe’s opposition party was shot in southwest Colombia on Saturday.

Santo’s peace is the deterioration of safety.
[retweet] So far 7 murdered candidates, 15 attempts on other candidates, and 187 threatened. Government, what guarantees?

NOTE: Yes, I refer to the FARC in the plural, while O’Grady does in the singular. Colombians refer to the FARC in the plural.

Colombia: The ugly “deal” with the FARC

Monday, September 28th, 2015

First, what’s ugly about it? No referendum. More on that in a moment.

Here’s the Comunicado conjunto # 60 sobre el Acuerdo de creación de una Jurisdicción Especial para la Paz (and the English Summary of the September 23 Government-FARC Communiqué on the Transitional Justice Accord). I could not find the text of the accord itself, but the Communiqué states,

While it is not in the text of the accord, President Juan Manuel Santos said that the sides have agreed to sign a final accord within the next six months.

Steven Taylor is optimistic,

Hopefully the current process will lead to real justice and reconciliation as well as a better state presence in the frontier regions of Colombia.

Mary O’Grady is not as sanguine:
Colombia’s Dubious Deal With Terrorists: Why President Santos won’t let voters decide the fate of his FARC peace agreement.

For starters, the White House pressured for a deal.
Pope Che intervened during last week’s visit to Cuba,

Referring to four years of Colombian government negotiations in Havana with the drug-trafficking terrorist group FARC, Pope Francis said “Please, we do not have the right to allow ourselves yet another failure on this path of peace and reconciliation.” That was pope-speak for “get this done.”

Then there’s the secrecy. As I stated above, as of the writing of this post I could not find the text of the accord itself, only of the Communiqué. O’Grady points out (emphasis added):

FARC atrocities will not land the perpetrators in jail. Instead they will go before one of two special tribunals, which will include judges from other countries. What countries, nobody knows.

Cuba? Venezuela?

If the accused acknowledge their crimes, their most severe penalties will be confinement to the rural areas where they already live, for five to eight years, and some community service. In the case of crimes against humanity this will violate Colombia’s commitments under the Geneva convention.

At the same time, the military, and members of the civilian government and civil society would be on trial alongside the terrorists – would they simply be sentenced to confinement to the areas where they already live, and some community service?

O’Grady continues,

The FARC has said it will not turn over its weapons. It owes reparations to victims and the nation, but how it will pay its debts or to whom nobody knows. FARC leaders will enter politics flush with cash acquired in the cocaine and kidnapping trades.

Last year Mr. Santos announced that he wanted to widen the definition of a political crime to include drug trafficking so that the FARC could claim that they are not gangsters but political actors. This was so he could meet their demand of no jail time.

O’Grady doesn’t mention that the Communiqué describes a number of vague measures, such as “Una ley de amnistía precisará el alcance de la conexidad.” (An amnesty law will specify the extent of the connectedness – what does that mean?), and that some crimes would fall exclusively under the Special Jurisdiction for Peace, the one with judges from unspecified foreign countries.

However, one thing is clear: Santos doesn’t want a referendum, as O’Grady states,

I’ve lost count of how many times Mr. Santos told me personally that Colombians would have a chance to vote on whatever was agreed upon in Havana. He repeated that pledge in interviews and numerous speeches to the nation. Yet on a radio show in August he stated categorically “I have never been on board with a referendum.” Now he calls a referendum “suicide.

Santos wants special commissions in Congress to approve the agreement, and is asking Congress for an enabling law granting him special powers

for 180 days so that he can dictate implementation of the deal.

Former president (who delivered the FARC a Terrible, Horrible, no Good, very Bad Year in 2008) and current senator Alvaro Uribe is opposed to the deal, but he’s not alone: Breakthrough in Farc talks triggers backlash in Colombia.

#AccordOfImpunity Santos and Farc will nominate the Tribunal that Congress will ratify. Terrorism imposes justice. Where are we heading?

Colombia: Deal with the FARC

Thursday, September 24th, 2015

Colombia, FARC Rebel Group Reach Breakthrough Agreement in Peace Talks. Sides agree on disarmament, war crime prosecution issues

I’ll post more on this later, but this photo does not bode well:

Jason Poblete is not optimistic.

Colombia: Is the U.S. pressuring Uribe to accept FARC terms?

Thursday, September 10th, 2015

Spain’s El País reports (in Spanish)
EE UU media entre Santos y Uribe sobre el proceso de paz en Colombia. En dos reuniones, el expresidente expresó sus reparos y propuestas y el Gobierno le aclaró “informaciones equivocadas” [U. S. mediates between Santos and Uribe on the Colombian peace process. In two meetings, the former president stated his misgivings and proposals and the Government cleared up “erroneous information.”]

Los dos encuentros, el primero el 12 de julio y el segundo este martes en la mañana, se han dado por invitación del enviado especial de Obama para el proceso de paz, Bernard Aronson, y el embajador de Washington en Bogotá, Kevin Whitaker. La primera duró dos horas y se centró, según Villegas, en la necesidad de que haya una “unión nacional” frente a los temas de paz. También se habló sobre la seguridad del país, una de las mayores preocupaciones del uribismo que insiste en que se ha deteriorado desde el inicio de los diálogos de paz con las FARC, hace ya tres años.

[My translation: The two meetings, on July 12th and last Tuesday, took place by invitation from Obama’s special envoy to the peace process in Havana, Bernard Aronson, and the U.S. Ambassador to Bogota, Kevin Whitaker. The first meeting lasted two hours and focused, according to (Colombia’s Defense Minister Luis Carlos) Villegas, on the need for a “national union” on the peace issues. They also discussed national security, a major priority of uribismo which insists has deteriorated since the start of the FARC talks three years ago.]

Tuesday’s meeting lasted five hours.

Now-senator Uribe has consistently insisted that the FARC completely disarm and its leaders must serve time in prison, and is firmly opposed to a government proposal for a special legislative commission that would allow for FARC member participation in Congress. The government, on the other hand, wants to expedite approval of this proposal.

Tweeting yesterday, Uribe stated:
The reform the Government announces is a coup against the people, against democracy, all in favor of the FARC.”

Conversation with the Government: The only option we’re allowed is for us to declare support to their accords with FARC

Uribe had sought support from U.S. congress members for his opposition stance last February.

In other Colombia news, Santos, who had tip-toed on the border dispute with Venezuela for fear that Venezuela may undermine his pet project of peace with the FARC, is now declaring that ‘the Bolivarian revolution has failed.’

[Post edited to add tweet]

Colombia: Today’s infographic

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015

From The Economist:

Click to enlarge

The visiting pope Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, July 6th, 2015

Pope Francis is touring Ecuador, Bolivia – where the witches are protesting – and Paraguay, extolling the Bolivarian revolution’s idea of a “great motherland.”

What a guy.

Bolivia’s Adepcoca (Asociación Departamental de Productores de la Hoja de Coca i.e., Coca Leaf Growers’ Departamental Association) have prepared 20,000 bags of coca leaves to gift the people lining up from the airport to La Paz, giving new meaning to the term goodie bag.

You really can’t make up this stuff.

Live sex show at Buenos Aires university sparks scandal
School authorities investigating why ‘post-porn’ exhibition was held in an open public lobby

La oposición argentina se examina en Buenos Aires y Córdoba
La derecha y el peronismo opositor aspiran a vencer en la capital argentina y en la segunda provincia más poblada del país

Report: Argentinean Government Robs over 90% of Farmer Profits
Soybeans Garner Attention as Workaround for High Tariffs, Export Restrictions

Tensions Rise In Bolivia As Indigenous Witches Prepare For The Pope’s Visit

Dilma in the back seat of a driverless car. Lovely metaphor for today’s Brazil.

Calling Capt. Louis Renault, US ‘routinely spied’ on Brazil
Wikileaks says it has evidence that the United States has routinely spied on senior Brazilian government officials since 2011 or earlier.

Brazil Says Diplomatic Spat with U.S. is Over

Brazilian Evangelicals set up a ‘sin free’ version of Facebook
A group of Evangelical Christians in Brazil created Facegloria as their own, sin-free, version of Facebook

British musician faces five years in Chilean jail after admitting dealing drugs
Alexander Harrild, who was educated at exclusive Dulwich College, is being held in one of Santiago’s most notorious prisons with rapists and murderers

Chile secured the first major trophy in their history on home soil courtesy of a penalty shootout win over Argentina in the Copa America final

Time to call the FARC’s bluff
Colombia’s peace process risks drifting to collapse

The president, whose hobbies include poker, now faces a choice. Call the FARC’s bluff by laying on the table a take-it-or-leave-it offer on justice—or risk the talks collapsing anyway in the cycle of retaliation. Burdened by disappointments in other areas, Mr Santos has staked his presidency on a peace agreement. But objectively it is the FARC’s negotiators who need it more. Return to war in Colombia, and sooner or later they will be killed.

FARC & ELN commit crime together or coordinating, regardless of how the Govt may want to treat them:”

Why Colombia’s first euthanasia was stopped with 15 minutes to go
Doubting doctors have now approved procedure for cancer patient they canceled last week

Costa Rica becomes 33rd country to launch pro-Israel caucus
The 20 Parliamentarians signed a foundation document reaffirming Israel as a Jewish state with Jerusalem as its capital.

No, Mr. President, Castroite Cuba Is Not What Change Looks Like

How Global Threats Have Crowded Obama’s Diplomacy AgendaPresident has sought to focus on Iran, Cuba, climate and trade, but Islamic State, China and Russia have muscled in

Optimist: US-Cuba Relations, A Race to the Bottom. But, in the End, Truth and Freedom Always Triumph

5 Questions Obama Must Answer About the Potential US Embassy in Cuba

Despite Obama, Business as Usual for Cuban Tyrants

Mensaje de la Sociedad Interamericana de Prensa a Su Santidad

Ecuador’s Libertarian Movement Rolls Out a Rescue Plan
Protesters Want Dialogue with Correa to Solve the Crisis

Ecuador under threat of “soft coup” by opposition, says Correa
Officials fear that spike in anti-government marches may mar pope’s visit on Sunday

Maduro Denounces Guyana “Aggression” against Venezuela

80% Of Central American Women, Girls Are Raped Crossing Into The U.S.

Mexican Police Recover Nearly 10,000 Stolen U.S. Visas

Mexico wants to tame disruptive teachers union

EXCLUSIVE: Illegal Who Confessed to Murdering Wife with Hammer Deported Four Times

Five Sentenced In $25M Medicare Fraud Involving Nicaragua, D.R.

Go.Away.Trump. Trump Fallout Continues: Panama Pulls Out of Miss Universe Pageant

Paraguay hero’s uncle dies while watching victory against Brazil
Derlis Gonzalez’s uncle suffered a heart attack

Peru drug mule’s transfer to Scottish prison ‘approved’
Melissa Reid could be back in the UK within weeks after reports Peru has agreed to move her to Scotland

It is not in Gov. García Padilla’s interest to improve the economy – you can bank on that. Treasurer Admits Puerto Rico Can Pay Debts, Doesn’t Want To
“Shameful” Myth Diverts Attention from Need for Frugality

Puerto Rico’s Financial Crisis Is U.S.’ Crisis, Too

The Beeb starts to catch on, Puerto Rico: The Greece of the Caribbean?

How a pie factory in South America is taking on the world
Fray Bentos – the town in Uruguay famous for its pies – could be named a World Heritage Site alongside the Forth Bridge, Sicilian churches and Genghis Khan’s birthplace at the end of this year’s Unesco meeting

Venezuela faces national beer drought
Striking workers linked to the Maduro government have forced the closure of breweries at Polar, the country’s largest producer and a beloved household name

Cuba and FARC, and their Sinister Presence in Venezuela

Tanta Pasión Por El Socialismo Y Para Ellos Solo Vales 15$ Al Mes

One year on, El Universal is fully “hegemonized”

The week’s posts and podcast
Happy Independence Day

On Independence Day, let’s thank Caesar

Ecuador: Sing along with Rafael

Venezuela: Corker in Caracas

Today’s “WTH moment” courtesy of the NYT

Repeat, it is not in Gov. García Padilla’s interest to improve the economy – you can bank on that. Puerto Rico: A few thoughts on the economic crisis

What amnesty means to legal immigrants

Up next: The King’s Spanish

Puerto Rico: Countdown to the Greecespot

Brazil: Dilma wants U.S. investment

Argentina: Buenos Aires closes Sunderland

Venezuela’s moola from the mullah: Iran’s new $500million credit line

Puerto Rico: the Greece of the Caribbean UPDATED

Podcast: “Che” & Walmart, US-Cuba embassies, Puerto Rico & US-Latin America issues

Colombia: FARC blows up oil pipeline

Saturday, June 27th, 2015

This week the FARC attacked Colombia’s oil infrastructure, the major way the Colombian economy is not held hostage by the narco-terrorist group. The worst attack was an explosion at a pipeline in the southeastern Nariño province.

FARC attack caused Colombia’s ‘biggest environmental disaster in 10 years’

A FARC attack on an oil pipeline in the southwest of Colombia has caused the country’s biggest environmental disaster in the past decade, said the country’s environment Minister on Thursday.

Alleged FARC rebels blew up a pipeline in the southeastern Nariño province on Monday, causing the spilling of more than 400,000 gallons of crude oil into nearby rivers, streams and mangroves.
. . .
Not only does the oil threaten the local ecosystem, it has cut off the water supply of the approximately 160,000 inhabitants of the town of Tumaco who depend on the polluted waters for their drinking water.

Rebel attacks on oil sites threaten peace talks in Colombia (emphasis added)

The FARC’s motive is thought to be a show of strength to force the government to agree to a bilateral cease-fire, something the Santos government has refused to do until a overall peace agreement has been signed, said Bruce Bagley, a Colombia specialist at the University of Miami.
. . .
Adam Isacson, a Colombia researcher at the Washington Office on Latin America, a think tank in Washington, said that despite the upsurge in violence, the odds are good that the peace talks will continue, noting that slow but incremental progress has been made. But the future hinges on whether the attacks continue.

The talks have stalled over the issue of

whether FARC commanders will stand trial and serve prison time for crimes against humanity, a prospect the rebels reject.

To an outsider like myself, the latest actions from the FARC make the answer to that crystal-clear.

Colombia: Pope Francis wants to meddle with the “peace process”

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

After earning Raul Castro’s thanks and praise for brokering the restoration of relations between Cuba and the US, and thereby screwing the dissidents as repression becomes more severe, now Francis wants to meddle in the Colombian “peace process.”

During a private audience with Colombian president Juan Manuel Santos, Francis

“. . . se mostró enseguida “dispuesto a desempeñar el papel que sea necesario” para poner fin al “más viejo conflicto de Latinoamérica”. [My translation: . . . he’s immediately “willing to take whatever part is needed” to put an end to “Latin America’s oldest conflict”.]

“Peace process” is a fluid term, as last week the Colombian military finally killed Jose Amin Hernandez Manrique, known as Marquitos, a top commander from the country’s second largest guerrilla group, the National Liberation Army (ELN), a group urging the FARC to continue its war following a surprise FARC attack that killed 11 soldiers.

To his credit, Santos didn’t jump at Francis’s offer. However, the FARC already thanked Pope Francis for his interest regarding the peace talks.

Why the hell does Francis want to meddle? First with Cuba/U.S., then with the global warming scam, and now with Colombia/FARC?

Is he after a Nobel Peace Prize?

Where did Church doctrine and spiritual matters go?

While a majority do call themselves at least nominally Catholic, Colombia does not have a state religion. The Pope’s words carry weight, but only among those who follow him.

Francis is working on the premise that, as head of the Catholic Church, his intervention will carry moral suasion.

Here’s the catch: It cannot.

The FARC, the ELN, and any of the other sundry Marxist narco-terrorist groups, have, for half a century, kidnapped, tortured, killed, maimed, raped, stolen from, and perpetrated heinous crimes on their fellow countrymen. They will only go along for as long as, and only if, it serves their purpose. They are immune to moral suasion.

Likewise on global warming, Francis speaks pretty words,

“Enlighten the masters of power and money so that they should not fall prey to the sin of indifference, so that they should love the common good, support the weak, and care about this world that we inhabit,”

Apparently Francis hasn’t realized that fossil fuels work for the common good. I highly recommend that he read Alex Epstein’s The Moral Case for Fossil Fuels which makes a convincing case that fossil fuels are the only way to develop cheap, reliable, plentiful energy for seven billion people, and that it’s immoral to deny it to the developing world.

For Francis, the thousands of Christians martyred wholesale by ISIS, the Cuban dissidents, the hundreds of millions relying on the use of fossil fuels, are just window dressing. Now the FARC stands to benefit from Francis’s intercession.

But back to Latin America:
Until and unless Francis publicly denounces the role of the Catholic Church in the safe passage of Nazis (among them Josef Megele) into Argentina, his country of birth, as far as I’m concerned, he can STFU.

The Mexican Nazi cheerleaders Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, June 15th, 2015

LatinAmerOf all the odd news I’ve read in the past decade or so, the Mexican Nazi cheerleaders take the cake for crassness and ignorance (and I’m being kind), but they’re an example of the abysmal lack of history education in our hemisphere.

More contradictions: Nisman’s laptop not accessed after his death

Argentina president attacks ‘ill-mannered’ Cameron over FalklandsCristina Kirchner condemns David Cameron after PM tells Argentine foreign minister to stop ‘threatening’ residents on South Atlantic islands

Bolivia Urges OAS to Approve Declaration of Indigenous Rights after 18 Years

Brazil $800m money laundering network broken up

CentAm aid cut back

Chilean Teachers Vote to Continue Unlimited Strike

Colombia Farc rebel attack leave 500,000 without powerColombia’s Farc rebels have shot dead three police officers and cut off power to almost half a million people, the military has said.

U.S. Senators Introduce Bill to End Cuba EmbargoThe Cuba Trade Act of 2015 would give private firms, including financial institutions, the right to conduct business with the Communist-ruled island.

Next Phase of the US-Cuba Faustian Bargain Goes Unchecked by Congress

Cuba’s Web Entrepreneurs Search for U.S. Clients, and Reliable Wi-FiAs the United States opens up to Cuba, a little-advertised circle of software developers, web designers and translators are selling their skills long-distance.


Ecuador Gets OPEC’s Support in Dispute with Chevron

Guatemalan Supreme Court Rules Pérez Molina Must Face the MusicJudiciary Greenlights Congressional Probe, Removal of Immunity

Guatemalans Demand Resignation of President Accused of Corruption

Economic war (a real one)

Time to dissolve the UN: UN peacekeepers ‘barter goods for sex’UN peacekeepers regularly barter goods for sex with people in the countries the world body is meant to be helping, a draft UN report says.

Wave of Protests Spreads to Scandal-Weary Honduras and Guatemala

Despite doctor’s advice … J’CAN WOMEN RUSHING ‘VIRGIN SOAP’

Mexico’s mid-term electionsPunishing bad behaviourThe mainstream political parties suffered setbacks. That is no reason for the government to retreat from reform

Panama Canal Expansion Surges Forward into New LocksDouble-Capacity “New Panamax” Ships to Pass from April 2016

Fifa crisis: Paraguay ends immunity for ConmebolParaguay is ending the diplomatic immunity of the headquarters for South America’s Conmebol football association, the latest fallout from the corruption scandal engulfing Fifa.

Visa-Free: Peruvians, Colombians Can Pack Their Bags for the EUOld World Opens Up to 90-Day Visits

Puerto Rico’s economy matters in the 2016 presidential race

Presidential pardonVoters overlooked Desi Bouterse’s dodgy past, hoping for a better future

Venezuela: Running on Fumes?

De genocidas y huelgas de hambre

Spain Brings Pain to Venezuela’s Leftists

The week’s posts:
Mexico: Springtime for Hitler

Cuba: Marielito blood on Fidel’s hands

Mexico: House Votes to Remove Country-of-Origin Labels on Meat Sold in U.S.

Ecuador: Hotlanta PR doesn’t come cheap

Cars: Private enterprise vs. government-owned

Venezuela: And now for the Iranian cars

2 en español: Lucio Gutierrez, Emili Blasco en el show de Bayly

Cuba: “For both sides”?

There was an election in Mexico

Rubio Vice

Argentina: Cristina visits Francis, for the fifth time

Puerto Rico: Flaming June at the Frick

Today at Drudge

The week’s books:

The Memorial Day 2015 Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, May 25th, 2015

LatinAmerToday we commemorate those who died for our great nation.

Argentinian Falklands veterans take ‘torture’ case to international arenaVeterans of the 1982 conflict recount their ordeal and the anti-Semitic abuse they faced in a press conference, including instances of beatings and sexual violence

Do orang-utans have human rights?Argentinian court hears arguments on whether keeping Sandra the orang-utan in a zoo is a human rights violation, but the Nisman case got dismissed.

NARCORREVOLUCIÓNEl negocio cocalero de Evo Morales y Nicolás Maduro

Almost 500 Students, Teachers Poisoned in Northern Bolivia

No marraqueta for you! Bakers Stop Baking Traditional Bolivian Bread in La Paz

The bakers of La Paz will not bake ‘marraqueta’, a traditional Bolivian bread symbolic of the city, as a part of a strike in opposition to the Bolivian government’s removal of a flour subsidy, a trade-union source told Efe.

Unlike my former neighbors in Princeton, I don’t share their fascination with Albert Einstein, but here it is anyway: A 65-year-old letter written by Albert Einstein found in Brazil schoolThe letter was reportedly discovered in a safe at a school in Porto Alegre in the south of the country

Clashes as Chile’s Bachelet seeks to regain popularityPresident looks to get reform agenda back on track in annual address to Congress as protesters and police clash outside.

Colombia Rebels Suspend Unilateral Cease-Fire after Army Operation

Farc rebels killed in new air strikeColombia’s security forces kill at least five rebels from the Farc a day after the left-wing rebel group suspended its unilateral ceasefire.

Cuban torturers sent to Vietnam to ‘extract’ information from American prisoners

Syrian Regime Officials Visit Cuba, Learn From Castro’s Outmaneuvering of Obama

Trafficking With the Enemy, American Taxpayers Deserve BetterDo Your Due Diligence Before Engaging in Authorized Transactions in Cuba, Especially When it Comes to the Confiscated Lands Issue

The Pope, Liberation Theology, Palestine and Castro…One by one, the great Western institutions have fallen to the infection of the left. Have they now captured the Church of Rome? Yes.

Chevron Update

Msgr. Romero Beatified in El Salvador Before Crowd of 300,000

Crowds greet Romero beatification
Huge crowd attends Romero's beatification ceremony

Huge crowds in El Salvador attend the beatification of Oscar Romero – the Roman Catholic archbishop murdered during the 1980-92 civil war.

Division remain over ‘martyr’

El Salvador Needs Economic Development, Rule of Law


Guatemalan Central Bank Chief Arrested on Corruption Charges

Guyana’s electionA time to healThe new government could narrow the racial divide

Telemundo Ignores Conservative Immigration Initiative. The Spanish-language networks are so awful at news, 80% of so-called Hispanics in the U.S. get their news elsewhere.

Jamaica rejects buggery law repeal, same-sex marriage

Mexico investigates new Guerrero disappearances


Gulf Cartel Had Camera Surveillance System Across Mexican Border City

‘No peace dividend’ for Panama border force

“Peace is not a bad thing, but it’s unlikely to solve our problems,” says Director of Panama’s Border Police, Frank Abrego.
He is referring to the prospect of a peace deal between the Colombian government and left-wing rebels of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (Farc).

Follow Panama: Dollarize

Counterfeit goods are big business in Paraguay

Peru declares state of emergency over mining violence

Final Section of Modern, Regional Undersea Cable Comes Ashore in Puerto Rico

Matías Campiani Private Equity Executive to Be Released From Uruguay Prison

Will the Venezuelan State Fail?

NYC’s most legendary prosecutor sees a darker threat in Venezuela’s alleged global cocaine hub

 Morgethau believed, and still does, that Chavez’s regime was allowing Iran to use the country’s banking system, and that former Venezeulan Interior Minister Tarek El Aissami specifically helped Iran’s agents obtain Venezuelan passports so they could travel freely around the world.

The week’s posts and podcast:
Memorial Day Commemoration Ceremonies

37 MS-13 indicted in Charlotte

VDH’s Pathei Mathos

Argentina: Veterans take torture case to inter-American court of human rights

Cuba and terrorism

Brazil: Up next, China’s 3,000mile railroad?

Communism: When the only way out is death

Mexico: Human rights division head resigns over Iguala case

Venezuela: Diosdado and drugs – whose powerplay?

Ecuador: Brazilian prosecutor sides with Chevron