Archive for the ‘elections’ Category

Argentina: The #tucumanazo, stories of a fraud foretold?

Thursday, August 27th, 2015

This does not bode well:
Riot police suppress protests calling for new elections in Tucumán

Allegations of electoral fraud bring demonstrators out on the street in Argentinean province

At stake was the governorship of Tucumán, where Alperovich and his associates from President Cristina Fernández de Kirchner’s Front for Victory (FPV) coalition manage a $3 billion dollar budget as they please. If no new elections are held, his vice-governor, Juan Manzur, will soon take over.
. . .
Though the province is the nation’s smallest, it has the fifth largest population and has now become the site of a landmark moment in this election season. According to preliminary results, presidential election favorite Daniel Scioli’s center-left FPV coalition won Tucumán by 14 points but this victory may cost him, with images of irregularities on the day of voting and other fraudulent maneuvers threatening to damage his standing.

Twitter #tucumanazo:

The sign reads, “I don’t fear the state’s repression.
I fear the people’s silence
.”

En español: Los spots de campaña de Sergio Massa

Tuesday, August 25th, 2015

Advertencia: Contiene malas palabras

Argentina: Cristina’s party wins primary

Tuesday, August 11th, 2015

Ruling Party Candidate Daniel Scioli Leads Argentina Primaries

Opposition parties could still rally together to win Argentina’s presidency later this year, but only if there’s a runoff.

Candidates in the general election need at least 45% of the vote, or 40% plus a 10-point margin over their closest rival, to win in the first round.

The Buenos Aires Herald says Scioli emerged stronger,

In the end, the only presidential contender for the FpV received 38.41 percent of valid votes against the 24.28 percent mustered by PRO chief Mauricio Macri, the 3.45 percent obtained by Radical (UCR) party leader Ernesto Sanz and the 2.34 percent received by Civic Coalition leader Elisa Carrió

Scioli’s meeting with Lula and Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, and heading to China and Russia, for some foreign policy bona fides (not that it would seem to matter).

Bayly had José Benegas in last night’s show, talking about the primary (in Spanish),

Benegas’s latest book is available on Amazon, Hagase tu voluntad: Bajar del cielo para conseguir un cargador de iPhone (Spanish Edition)

Don’t call that a debate

Friday, August 7th, 2015

Fox had the Republican presidential candidates last night; my impressions on it here.

And please Don’t call that a debate, it was a forum.

Mexico: The independent El Bronco

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

Jaime Rodríguez, a.k.a. “El Bronco,” is the frontrunner in the race for governor of the border state of Nuevo Leon, a major economic hub and home to the third-largest metropolitan area in Mexico.

Just a few years ago, such an insurgent candidacy was not even possible. A constitutional change in 2012 allowed candidates to run as independents in Mexico, a major shift for a country that was governed by the Institutional Revolutionary Party (PRI) for most of the past century. Many people say it is no coincidence that an independent is leading in some polls in a key state at a time when corruption scandals have rocked the national government and many people are searching for alternatives.

El Bronco has guts,

Initially, Rodriguez gained fame in his state primarily by staying alive. During his time as mayor of the suburb of Garcia, from 2009 to 2012, drug-war violence had transformed the Monterrey area from an industrial metropolis known for its wealth into one of the country’s deadliest urban centers. After Rodriguez was elected, his 22-year-old son — one of his six children — was abducted and killed. Rodriguez said his 2-year-old daughter was also briefly kidnapped. He was one of numerous municipal officials in Mexico targeted by traffickers; he survived at least two assassination attempts, including one in which he said gunmen riddled his car with bullets.

Risky business: VIOLENCE GRIPS MEXICO AHEAD OF MIDTERM ELECTIONS

The elections are scheduled for Sunday, June 7.



Would Peru go for Chavismo?

Monday, March 30th, 2015

Mary O’Grady writes about the reasons behind Peru’s recent economic success: A market model that allows for

  • a vibrant consumer class that is entrepreneurial and creative
  • openness to imports
  • structural reforms that included ending a punishing system of import tariffs and quotas
  • fiscally conservative governance.

However,

Still, the downturn in commodity prices is eating into growth and the slowdown that began last year continues. Market forecasts for GDP growth are in the 3% range for 2015. Peru’s economy is performing far better than most in the region, but lackluster is not what Peruvians have come to expect.

The obvious answer to this lethargy is more aggressive trade opening on key products like sugar and corn, more tax cutting and deregulation. But Mr. Humala’s popularity is sagging and he is unlikely to do anything bold. Meanwhile, opponents of economic freedom will turn slower growth into opportunity by linking stagnant incomes in the market economy and corruption.

As O’Grady points out, this means Peru Is Chavismo’s Next American Target
Corruption scandals give the left an opening in the 2016 presidential election.

On a seemingly unrelated topic,
The Obama administration insists on easing restrictions on Cuba’s merciless Communist dictatorship while Cuba’s dependence on Venezuelan oil goes bust. Once Cuba’s economy improves cosmetically (because you can bet those in power will not give up their acquisitiveness), the Cuban propaganda machine will use this as another tool in its propaganda arsenal against market economies.

No matter how ruinous Cuban-driven Chavismo is in real life; propaganda is the only thing Cuba’s regime is good at, and it is particularly effective in Latin America.

Face it: The fact that the article talks about Chavismo – instead of Castrocommunism – itself is a success for the Cuban propaganda machine; in reality, “The Venezuelan regime is a puppet controlled by the Cubans.”

—————————————

Related reading:
Hernando de Soto’s excellent book, The Other Path, available on Kindle for under $10, and Ian Bremmer’s The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations?

Ted throws his hat in the ring

Monday, March 23rd, 2015

and he didn’t need no stinkin’ teleprompter, either (video of full speech here, text of full speech here),

TedCruz.org

Why weren’t taxes an issue in the last election?

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

Having voted with my feet, I’m asking Why weren’t taxes an issue in the last election? at Da Tech Guy Blog.

Weren’t they?

Brazil: A petition to the White House

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

Brazilian blogger Rafael Merlo of Observatório Conservador, who uncovered Dilma Rousseff’s fake Twitter followers back in July, is petitioning the White House, and emailed me the following (emphasis added),

Two weeks ago (26/10) took place the presidential election in Brazil. By a narrow gap of votes (3%) Dilma Rousseff, the current president and candidate for the socialist Workers Party, was reelected.

Although the international community reported the election as democratic, this is not the perception of significant part of the Brazilians. The election was marred by allegations of corruption and embezzlement of public funds by the Rousseff’s campaign. Other sordid attitudes were taken by the socialists during the election, for example:

– the constant threat of ending the food allowance of the poor people if Rousseff was not reelected;
– attack to the building of the largest circulation magazine in the country, which had denounced government corruption;
– incitement to prejudice and confrontation between Brazilians from the south and north, etc.

But what’s even scarier is that there were evidences of fraud in the elections, and the Brazilian authorities are silent about that. The Superior Electoral Court, the highest court of the election, is chaired by a Workers Party former lawyer. The defeated candidate Aecio Neves, who belongs to the Social Democratic Party, accepted the result quickly and without question. People are outraged and there is no leadership to guide them and give them voice.

That growing wave of outrage is taking the streets. Last Saturday, thousands of people protested in major cities across the country calling for an audit of the election, the investigation of complaints and, if proven, the impeachment of President Rousseff. All this is being muted and distorted by the Brazilian media, which is totally left-biased.

Rousseff and the Workers Party are implanting the Bolivarian comunism in Brazil. And that should concern the Americans as well, because the growth of bolivarian regimes in Latin American is the result of a major plan put into action by an international enemy called Sao Paulo Forum. The Sao Paulo Forum is the most powerfull political organization in Latin America. It was created in the 90’s by Fidel Castro and Lula to “recover in Latin America what was lost in Eastern Europe”. You can read more about the Sao Paulo Forum here:http://bit.ly/1usa4DV.

With the petition to the White House (http://1.usa.gov/1tJ5bUN) the Brazilians are not expecting any kind of support from president Obama itself, of course, because we know well what we can expect from liberals. But the White House and the US government is much more than Obama and the liberals: we would like to talk to the good American citizens concerned with the future of our continent. And this petition serves two purposes:

1) call the attention of Americans regarding the political situation on the continent, especially the alignment of the Bolivarian communist regimes with declared enemies of the United States, such as Russia and Iran.

2) put in circulation in the US and international media the name of the real enemy that must be fought on the American continent: the Sao Paulo Forum, the agent that is creating a new soviet union in Latin America.

I would be very grateful if you could help spread this petition among your family, friends, and readers of you website: http://1.usa.gov/1tJ5bUN

The petition reads,
WE PETITION THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION TO:
Position yourself against the Bolivarian communist expansion in Brazil promoted by the administration of Dilma Rousseff

On 10/26, Dilma Rousseff was reelected, and will continue his party’s plan to establish a communist regime in Brazil – the Bolivarian molds propounded by the Foro de São Paulo. We know that in the eyes of the international community, the election was fully democratic, but the ballot boxes used are not reliable, apart from the fact the heads of the judiciary, are mostly members of the winning party. Social policies also influenced the choice of the president, and people were threatened with losing their food allowance if they do not re-elect Dilma. We call a White House position in relation to communist expansion in Latin America. Brazil does not want and will not be a new Venezuela, and the USA that need help the promoters of democracy and freedom in Brazil.
Created: Oct 28, 2014

Neves’s acceptance of the results may be due to several factors, which, unfortunately, I am unable to discuss since I am not well-versed enough on Brazil’s internal politics. However, Merlo is accurate when he says that the Foro de Sao Paolo was Castro and Lula’s creation.

Professor Luis Fleischman points out regarding the election,

The vote shows a deep division in the country between the richer South and the poorer North. The North has been the largest recipient of social welfare programs from the Federal government. It is precisely because of these welfare policies that a large majority of people in the North voted for Rousseff, giving her a narrow margin of victory. . The business sector, unhappy with high taxes and other obstacles imposed on them definitely voted against Rousseff. The middle class, that was the key to the protests over the poor quality of health and educational services last year, also voted against Rousseff.

Bottom line, it is populist policies that enabled Rousseff to get reelected.

As Fleischman says,

Populism is not just an economic burden. It also makes the party in power feel more complacent and entitled as it enjoys a degree of popularity.

A lesson Americans should keep in mind.



Comparing voting in NJ to voting in FL

Wednesday, November 5th, 2014

IMG_0743Today I’m Comparing voting in NJ to voting in FL at Da Tech Guy Blog.

I didn’t go into the local politics in my article, but after decades of political campaigns in four states, I had never experienced such bombardment as the local Florida Crist-Scott campaign this year. You could not escape the campaigns: TV, radio, robocalls, internet (Google ads ran Crist ads in my blog), knocking on doors, campaign workers at the mall, both sides did not let up.