Archive for the ‘drugs’ Category

Mexico: Remains of #Ayotzinapa students found

Saturday, November 8th, 2014


Demonstrators last month

Mexican Official: Remains Believed to Be Students Found
Investigators have found the incinerated remains they believe belong to the missing 43 students who were allegedly abducted by police and handed over to a local drug gang to be executed, Mexico’s attorney general said.

The remains will be sent to the University of Innsbruck in Austria, which officials said had the most advanced forensics laboratory, for further attempts at identification. Because of the extent of the incineration, Mr. Murillo Karam said he set no deadline.

Mexico missing student: Gang members ‘confess’ to killing 43 in Iguala and burning their bodies

Mexico: 22,000 missing, 43 of them are the #Ayotzinapa students

Thursday, November 6th, 2014

#HastaEncontrarlos

I have been blogging about the 43 student teachers missing since September 26, but, as I pointed out in yesterday’s podcast, they are only a few of the thousands missing/killed by the drug cartels.

How many?
At least 22,000:

But searchers have found plenty of other horrors, including a string of mass graves with 50 unidentified victims that DNA tests show are not the students. Most of those victims were chopped into bits and set on fire.

As the discovery of the other grave sites shows, the mystery of the missing students isn’t an isolated case. The Mexican government estimates more than 22,000 people went “missing” during the last eight years of violence here between cartels fighting each other and security forces. Human-rights groups say the toll could be far higher.

If most of those missing are dead, as rights groups fear, that would significantly raise Mexico’s already staggering death toll of some 100,000 drug-related homicides during the past eight years by more than a fifth.

Before you blame the war on drugs, bear in mind that the cartels (sometimes with the help of the authorities) are killing each other and whoever dares to speak against them:

Mexico’s missing is a somewhat different phenomenon. Here, the crimes tend to be more about money than ideology. Drug and kidnapping gangs have perpetrated most of Mexico’s disappearances, officials say. But, if investigators’ version of events holds true, the case of students shows the line between organized crime and government security forces can be thin.

Disappearing victims has long been a strategy of the warring gangs, who earn the bulk of their income trafficking marijuana and methamphetamine, heroin and cocaine to U.S. consumers.

Someone knows where the 43 students are, but no one is talking.

In other headlines,
Mexico’s 43 Missing Students: Iguala Mayor Jose Luis Abarca ‘Murdered Political Rival’; additionally,

Abarca has been accused in the past of direct participation in torture and murders of activists, while his wife Maria de los Angeles Pineda Villa has links to gangs as members of her family (at least three brothers) are part of the Beltrán Leyva drugcartel.

Mexico: 43 students missing since September 26

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

#HastaEncontrarlos

Vigilantes in Mexico students search
Hundreds of members of self-defence groups join the search in the Mexican town of Iguala for 43 missing students who disappeared almost two weeks ago.
None of the missing are known to have crime connections:

The students, from a teacher training college in Ayotzinapa, travelled to the nearby town of Iguala to protest against what they perceived as discriminatory hiring practices for teachers.

After a day of protests and fundraising, they wanted to make their way back to their college.

Accounts of what happened next differ.

Members of the student union say they hitched a lift aboard three local buses, but the police says the students seized the buses.

In the hours which followed, six people were killed when armed men opened fire on the three buses and that of a third division football team which they presumably mistook for one carrying students.

Three students, a footballer, the driver of one of the buses and a woman in a taxi were shot dead. Many more were injured.

Municipal police gave chase to the students, and are believed to have fired at them.

Twenty-two officers have been detained in connection with the shooting.

But there are also reports of other armed men opening fire on the students. Eight people not belonging to the municipal police have also been arrested.

Disappearance
Following the incident on the night of 26 September, 57 students were reported missing.

On 30 September it was announced that 13 of them had returned to their homes.

One name was found to have appeared in the list of the missing twice, leaving 43 students unaccounted for.

On 4 October, prosecutors announced they had found six shallow graves containing the remains of at least 28 people.

Authorities are investigating the possible involvement of a local drug gang called Guerreros Unidos (United Warriors, a pun, since the state’s name is Guerrero), led by a thug nicknamed El Chucky, and are affiliated with the Beltran Leyva cartel. Additionally, Iguala’s mayor, Jose Luis Abarca Velazquez, his wife, Maria de los Angeles Pineda Villa, and the police chief have not been seen since the events on 26 September. However, so far the biggest suspect is Mexico’s Police

The state prosecutor investigating why the police opened fire on students from their vehicles has found mass graves in Iguala — the small industrial city where the confrontations occurred — containing 28 badly burned and dismembered bodies.

The prosecutors had already arrested 22 police officers after the clashes, saying the officers secretly worked for, or were members of, a local gang. Now they are investigating whether the police apprehended the students after the confrontation and deliberately turned them over to the local gang. Two witnesses in custody told prosecutors that the gang then killed the protesters on the orders of a leader known as El Chucky.

According to witnesses

More police officers arrived, accompanied by gunmen in plainclothes. Prosecutors have now identified these shooters as members of a cell of assassins called “Guerreros Unidos” or “Warriors United,” who work for the Beltran Leyva cartel. The cartel’s head Hector Beltran Leyva was arrested last week following the incident.

Federal agents are now in charge instead of local police.

Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto has vowed to identify and punish those responsible for the recent disappearance of 43 students after clashes with police.

On one front, the September 26 murders of six people in Iguala, Guerrero, has plunged the conflict-ridden state south of Mexico City into renewed political turmoil.

Paco Almaraz features the governor of the state of Guerrero in the burn-out unit (in Spanish),



Mexico: La Tuta’s newest YouTube

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

Knights templar chief Servando Gómez “La Tuta” (the teacher) has a new one,

Video shows Mexican drug lord paying journalists for ‘good press’

The video, which was published yesterday by Mexican news site MVS, shows two reporters from Mexico’s troubled Michoacan state appearing to accept money from one of the country’s most wanted drug lords, Servando Gomez, leader of the Knights Templar Cartel. The men then discuss a “communication strategy” to improve the cartel’s image and are heard asking for trucks and cameras.

The handoff occurs at the: 22:56 mark

An offer they really could not refuse.

Chile: $30m of cocaine and marijuana seized

Thursday, September 4th, 2014

The drug trade doesn’t move just from South America to Europe and the USA:

Drugs raid recovers tonnes of cocaine and marijuana in Chile
Dramatic footage shows Chilean authorities seizing almost $30m worth of cocaine and marijuana during a raid

According to a regional prosecutor, the drugs were intended to be sold domestically during Chile’s independence celebrations which are taking place later this month.

Video below the fold,
(more…)

The ISIS border terror alert Carnival of Latin America and the Caribbean

Monday, September 1st, 2014

LatinAmerJudicial Watch has an Imminent Terrorist Attack Warning By Feds on US Border, which, as Andrew McCarthy explains,

this is not a surprise — particularly less than two weeks before September 11. But it is nonetheless jarring to read.

ARGENTINA
Argentina workers claim general strike ‘successful’
Labour groups opposed to Argentine President Cristina Fernandez say the second general strike of the year has been a success
.

More bat-shit craziness: Argentina contemplates moving capital from Buenos Aires
Buenos Aires is seen as being geographically remote from much of the rest of the country
Buenos Aires could be replaced as capital of Argentina by a city 600 miles to the north [Santiago del Estero], under a plan floated by Cristina Kirchner

BOLIVIA
Bolivia Seizes Guns Bound for Brazilian Crime Outfit, the intended for the gang known as the First Capital Command (Primeiro Comando da Capital, or PCC).

BRAZIL
Other than post-Chavez Venezuela, Brazil is the worst out of 11 countries ranked by a joint study conducted by Brazilian and German economic think tanks.

Brazil Falls Into Recession
Brazil’s economy fell into a technical recession and cut its growth forecast, delivering another blow to President Dilma Rousseff’s re-election hopes.

Inside the all-woman village desperate for men
The women of of Noiva do Cordeiro are “appealing” for eligible men
Video
Harry Wallop visits the small rural Brazilian village of Noiva do Cordeiro, populated by beautiful women who are looking for love

CHILE
Immigration: Minister of Defense Warns Against “Entering Chile without Authorization”

Chile Manufacturing Falls More Than Forecast as Retail Slows

COLOMBIA
Fugitive Colombian Warlord Nabbed in Panama

Hoy en La Noche grupo de cubanos espera en Colombia respuesta a solicitud de refugio político:

CUBA
Why work? You earn more selling three avocados a day.

The Vatican’s man in Havana says Cubans’ only hope for a better life is to escape Cuba

Internet for Cubans vs. Helping Castro’s Censorship

Oh! Oh! Canada: Party girls UPDATE

DOMINICA
Dominica Will Be First Nation with Universal Bitcoin Possession
70,000 Island Residents Get a “Bitcoin Drop” March 2015

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Dominican Republic investigate ex-nuncio for pedophilia
Wesolowski appealing def[r]ocking by the Vatican

DRUGS
Drug Use and Drug Spending: How the Washington Post and the President Get It Wrong

ECUADOR
The Future of Dollarization in Ecuador

Ecuador to bring in digital currency
Ecuador says it will introduce the world’s first digital currency issued by a central bank and it will go into circulation in December

GUATEMALA
Jews ‘forced’ from Guatemala villageMen from a Jewish community load furniture onto a lorry in San Juan La Laguna
Some 230 members of an Orthodox Jewish group begin leaving a village in western Guatemala after a bitter row with the local indigenous community.

HONDURAS
Honduras Knocks on Door of Development Bank to Fund ZEDEs
Catrachos Seek Peace with Neighbors in Sensitive Gulf of Fonseca Region

JAMAICA
Jamaican Ends Legal Challenge to Anti-Sodomy Law after growing fearful about violent backlashes.

MEXICO
Mexico Looks to Raise Wages
Mexico City’s leftist Mayor Miguel Ángel Mancera raised pressure on the federal government with a proposal to lift the federal minimum wage—which lags only behind Haiti in the hemisphere—to $6 per day for 2015.

Mexico’s Pemex Forecasts 6.7% Drop in Crude Production in 2014
The head of Pemex’s exploration and production division said production will fall from 2.52 million barrels per day in 2013 to 2.35 million bpd at the close of 2014

More Than 134,000 Petition Obama Admin. to Demand Release of Sgt. Tahmooressi — Here’s the Response They Received Instead

NICARAGUA
Nicaragua Landslide Traps Gold Miners
Rescuers in Nicaragua raced to reach at least 24 freelance gold miners trapped by a landslide, including 20 who have been located and have managed to communicate with emergency crews.

PANAMA
Widened Panama Canal may threaten West Coast port jobs

PARAGUAY
Brazil, Worse Than Paraguay

PERU
Peru Moves Van der Sloot to Tougher Prison

PUERTO RICO
Puerto Rico Lures Franklin as Equity Funds Buy Junk: Muni Credit

URUGUAY
More than 20 companies bid to supply legal pot in Uruguay

VENEZUELA
Venezuelans Feel Less Safe than Any Population on Earth
Residents Rate “Law and Order” Worse than War-Torn Syria

Health Secretary: Venezuelan Medical Care in Critical Condition
Gustavo Villasmil Details How the Brain Drain and Supply Shortages Feed the Crisis

Venezuela’s Black Market Bolivar Slides to Record Low

Venezuela is becoming a crude importer. Discuss.

Chavismo promoting CITGO sale tells us more than what we care to know

There Is Too Much Money To Be Made In The Bolivarian Revolution I: The Gasoline Racket.

“Los venezolanos en el callejón sin salida del chavismo”

The Venezuela Case Study In How Not To Help The Poor

A Proposal of a New Flag from a Opposition Movement to Chavismo and the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela {Venezuatu}…! THE NEW COUNTRY OF: Venecian Guiana !

HUMOR
HAHAHA You go to the beach and run into Hugo Chavez

The week’s posts and podcast:
A day in the life of the Panama Canal

ISIS border terror alert?

Colombia: Former Pablo Escobar lead henchman goes free

En español: Unidad de quemados

Brazil: 3 beheaded in prison riot

Today’s illegal alien invasion headlines

Argentina: Enter Soros

Peña Nieto goes to LA

Colombia: Was military intelligence hacked?

At Da Tech Guy Blog:
The audacity of taupe

Warren Buffett and his American dollars for Canadian doughnuts

Podcast:
Gloria M Strassburger, author, plus Fausta Wertz editor of Fausta’s Blog


Colombia: Luis Carlos Cervantes murdered

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

A classic mob hit: The Colombian journalist’s car was stopped on the road, and Cervantes was shot dead . . . three weeks after he was denied protection by the authorities, who now claim that “according to the information obtained from a risk assessment, there weren’t any links between the threats Cervantes received, and his work as a journalist.”

Marcela Estrada has the story:

 Four years ago, Cervantes served as a correspondent for news channelTeleantioquia. His problems started in 2010, when he covered the collusion between government employees from the Bajo Cauca region and the paramilitary and drug trafficking group, Los Urabeños. This occurred most heavily in Tarazá and Caucasia, both cities in the department of Antioquia,

In April 2010, Cervantes was attacked by a policeman while he was reporting on the capture of another police officer in Tarazá, who was accused of handling war munitions for paramilitary groups. Three years later, a grenade exploded just a few meters away the radio station where he worked.

In October 2013, Cervantes asserted to the authorities that the local leader ofLos Urabeños, Germer Andrés Rebolledo, also known as “El Escamoso,” was the instigator behind the threats. That same year, Rebolledo was detained by the police, for allegedly killing another journalist, Luis Eduardo Gómez.

After filing several complaints, Colombia’s National Agency for Protection assigned Cervantes around-the-clock state protection. From then on, the journalist was always escorted by two bodyguards and a police car.

Nonetheless, on July 20, the agency determined that the journalist was no longer at risk, and took away his protection program.

Four days after he was off the protection program, a stranger shows up, a text tells him to get out of town, ten days later he was executed, but the National Agency for Protection claims Cervantes’s murder had nothing to do with his profession? The International Federation of Journalists (IFJ) is not buying it.

In response to the clamor generated by the assassination, the Colombian government’s Procuraduría General (prosecutor’s office, the equivalent of the U.S. Attorney General) is creating a “special agency” to work with the Medellín prosecutor’s office’s current investigation (link in Spanish).

As Drudge says, “developing.”


Venezuela: El Pollo as big fish

Monday, August 11th, 2014

Mary O’Grady on today’s WSJ:
A Terrorist Big Fish Gets Away
The Netherlands refuses to extradite FARC ally Hugo Carvajal Barrios to the U.S.

While O’Grady contradicts herself on the criminals’ intent, saying, on the one hand, “America’s voracious appetite for illegal drugs has allowed violent political actors to create powerful transnational criminal organizations”, while on the other hand stating, “All of this terror is done in the name of social justice for Colombians,” the effect of current U.S. foreign policy is clear: The bottom line? (emphasis added)

Yet it’s not surprising that the Netherlands decided it would be less costly to be on the good side of the bad guys than to be on the bad side of the good guys. After six years of the Obama global retreat, any leader would be crazy to expect the U.S. to go to the mat for an ally, even one that stuck its neck out for Uncle Sam. So when Venezuela threatened military and economic retribution at the Netherlands Antilles if Carvajal was extradited, the Dutch foreign affairs minister relented.

Read the whole thing here.

Mexico: Knights Templar chief La Tuta’s on YouTube

Tuesday, August 5th, 2014

. . . and everyone’s watching.

La Tuta’s touting.

I mentioned this on yesterday’s Carnival, and the WSJ today reports on it,
Alleged Mexican Drug Lord’s Videos With Officials Lead to Arrests
After more than six months on the run from federal troops, Servando Gómez, who allegedly heads the Knights Templar syndicate, is striking back with videos purporting to link officials and their relatives to his gang.

The videos, which in recent months have emerged online, show politicians and their family members meeting with Servando Gómez, known as “La Tuta”—the teacher—who heads the Knights Templar syndicate. Federal officials say Mr. Gómez dominates organized crime and terrorizes residents of Michoacán state.
. . .
In another video posted to YouTube last week, Mr. Gómez accuses some leaders of the rural guards of links to a rival gangster band, the Jalisco Cartel-New Generation, which produces methamphetamine for the U.S. market, officials say.

Walter White would not have allowed himself to be videotaped.

Here are some of the YouTubes:

With Rodrigo Vallejo Mora, son of former Michoacán mayor Fausto Vallejo (206,335 views as of the writing of this post),

With the mayor of Pátzcuaro (4,023 views),

And here he claims the vigilantes owe him drug money, but he offers no proof (28,389 views),


Colombia’s narco-subs

Saturday, August 2nd, 2014

Prensa Libre reports that a gang that manufactures and operates submarines has been nabbed. They worked for the Úsuga clan. The subs are used for transporting cocaine to Honduras, the U.S., and Europe.

It’ll be interesting to see what information comes about from the seizure of the shipyard; their subs could carry a crew of four, and seven tons of drugs.

Certainly, the technology has evolved immensely since the days of Pablo Escobar.

The Center for International Maritime Security (CIMSEC) reports on narco-subs:
CAPABILITY ANALYSIS, SOUTH AMERICA
NARCO-SUBMARINES: DRUG CARTELS’ INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY
(emphasis added):

In fact, as of June 2012, maritime drug smuggling accounts for 80% of the total illicit flow from the Andean region into Honduras, Mexico and other mid-way transportation regions prior to entry into the U.S. About 30% of the maritime flow is estimated by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to utilize narco submarines. Overall, however, maritime interdiction rates are very low.

The numbers of these vessels which now exist is also highly debatable with potentially dozens of them being produced every year by criminal organizations in Colombia such as the FARC (Fuerzas Armadas Revolucionarias de Colombia), Rastrojos, and Urabeños. One point greatly influencing the numbers of these vessels which exist at any specific time is if they are utilized once and then scuttled after their delivery (the traditional U.S. military viewpoint) or if they are utilized multiple times (the traditional Colombian military viewpoint). Depending on the perspective held, greater or lesser numbers of narco subs would be required to be produced each year to replenish the vessels lost due to capture, accidental sinking, intentional-scuttling to avoid capture, and, potentially most importantly, at the end of a delivery run.

The CIMSEC will be releasing a paper,

Narco-Submarines – Specially Fabricated Vessels Used For Drug Smuggling Purposes”, soon to be released by the Foreign Military Studies Office (FMSO) and intended to be an initial primer on the subject of narco-submarines.
. . .
Finally, it is important that we collectively consider the potential of these types of vessels to transport more than just narcotics: the movement of cash, weapons, violent extremists, or, at the darkest end of the spectrum, weapons of mass destruction.

The study will appear on the FMSO website. I’ll link to it when it does.

UPDATE:
Linked to by Silvio Canto. Thank you!