Archive for the ‘crime’ Category

Puerto Rico: NY Yankees’ Jorge Posada scammed out of $11million

Tuesday, December 16th, 2014

New York Yankees catcher Jorge Posada is scammed out of $11 MILLION in ‘jaw-dropping’ money-management scam


Posada did not discover the conspiracy until after he fired Collar and Fernandez, who operated under their own company Quantum Family Office Group, for unrelated reasons in 2010.

Posada should have run all documents by his lawyer (not his wife), but I hope the perps do time.

And,
Never have only one financial advisor.



Mexico: Gulf Cartel run from Texas

Thursday, December 11th, 2014

Which should come as no surprise,
THREE MEXICAN CARTEL LEADERS CAUGHT IN TEXAS SINCE OCTOBER

A Tamaulipas law enforcement official who spoke with Breitbart Texas said the Gulf Cartel is undergoing a hostile takeover of sorts where a faction of old timer’s that include Gulf Cartel members and original Zetas is moving in trying to run out the younger inexperienced crowd.

“The younger ones are the ones doing all sort of crazy stunts kidnappings, extortion and such,” the official said. “The old timers claim to want to bring peace or at least that’s what they claim.”

The claims were made through a communiqué published by Breitbart Texas where the Zetas and the Gulf Cartel claim to make peace and plan on restoring peace so they can focus on their business without disturbing the public.

People tend to confuse the definition of cartel when used in the drug trade. Cartel, in economics, means

An organization created from a formal agreement between a group of producers of a good or service, to regulate supply in an effort to regulate or manipulate prices. A cartel is a collection of businesses or countries that act together as a single producer and agree to influence prices for certain goods and services by controlling production and marketing. A cartel has less command over an industry than a monopoly – a situation where a single group or company owns all or nearly all of a given product or service’s market. In the United States, cartels are illegal; however, the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) – the world’s largest cartel – is protected by U.S. foreign trade laws.

In the drug trade, however, Wikipedia has it right (emphasis added),

A drug cartel is any criminal organization developed with the primary purpose of promoting and controlling drug trafficking operations. They range from loosely managed agreements among various drug traffickers to formalized commercial enterprises. The term was applied when the largest trafficking organizations reached an agreement to coordinate the production and distribution of cocaine. Since that agreement was broken up, drug cartels are no longer actually cartels, but the term stuck and it is now popularly used to refer to any criminal narcotics related organization, such as those in Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, South Korea, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Japan, Italy, France, United States, Colombia, United Kingdom, Netherlands, Russia, Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Bolivia, Paraguay, Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Click on the map for an interactive map of the Mexican cartels:

Colombia: FARC using al-Qaeda for European drug trade

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

Via Álvaro Uribe’s tweet,

FARC using al-Qaeda networks to bring in cocaine in Sahel FARC-coke-al-Qaeda

The EFE article (in Spanish, my translation) FARC Using al-Qaeda Networks to Bring in Cocaine in Sahel

The FARC attempt to bring cocaine into Europe through the Sahel [note: a band of desert stretching across Africa – from Senegal in the West to Eritrea in the East], and are relying on Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) networks active on the Argelia, Mali and Mauritania border, according to Monday’s Al Massae Moroccan newspaper.

The newspaper, quoting an official report, explains that the FARC use the Sahel as springboard to Europe, after entering through Argelia and Morocco.

According to sources, AQIM charges the FARC a 15% “tax” on the cocaine value to guarantee a sage passage through the vast area it controls from the Western Sahara to north Mali, Mauritania y Argelia.

This alleged collusion between the FARC and AQIM translates into heavier weapons traffic in the zone, believed to be paid by the drug trade.

Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) has gone on the record supporting the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS).

The Telegraph has an interactive Al-Qaeda map: Isis, Boko Haram and other affiliates’ strongholds across Africa and Asia

Al Qaeda in the Islamic Magreb
Operates in the Saharan countries – mainly in southern Algeria and Libya, Mauritania, Mali and Niger. Formed from a hard-core of fighters involved in Algeria’s civil war in the 1990s, in which Islamist fighters took arms after a democratically-elected Islamic government was ousted. Briefly set up its own fiefdom in northern Mali in 2012, before being ousted by French-led security force in January 2013. Makes a living by kidnapping foreigners, earning an estimated $60m from ransoms in the last decade.

And Colombia’s president wants unelected FARC members in the Senate, and broadening the definition of “political crime” to include drug trafficking, but only for FARC members.

[Post corrected for more accurate translation.]



Argentina: Investigate Cristina, get impeached?

Friday, November 28th, 2014

Argentine Probe Sparks Dispute Between Government, Judiciary
Judge Heading Investigation Into President’s Business Activities Faces Call for Impeachment

Last week, federal agents raided the office of the Kirchner family hotel company, Hotesur, as part of an investigation by Federal Judge Claudio Bonadio into allegations that the company hasn’t filed financial statements for years.

Investigators said that when they arrived at Hotesur’s registered headquarters in downtown Buenos Aires, they found abandoned office space.

Since the raid, the government has issued scathing attacks on the judicial system, saying Judge Bonadio is overreacting to a minor matter of missing paperwork.

In a message posted on the presidency’s official Twitter account, Mrs. Kirchner claimed Judge Bonadio owns a stake in a company whose paperwork isn’t up-to-date: “This is just like Hotesur. Will some judge now order a raid?”

Congresswoman Margarita Stolbizer filed a criminal complaint against Kirchner and Lázaro Báez, a longtime family friend and business partner of the Kirchner, amid allegations of money laundering.



Mexico’s failures and immigration

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

Monica Showalter writes an IBD editorial on how Mexico’s President Celebrates Obama Amnesty, But Should Be Ashamed
About That Gloating From Mexico
(emphasis added)

With the vast majority of America’s 11 million illegal Mexican citizens — who flee their country’s corruption, poverty, low growth, rampant crony capitalism and embedded socialism — protesting over the past decade against getting sent back there, Pena Nieto ought to be embarrassed to show his face in public.
Fact is, the Obama amnesty highlights the awful failure of Mexico as an economic entity that can’t even create an acceptable place to live for a large number of its citizens.

Two-thirds of the eligible beneficiaries of the Obama amnesty — 3.2 million people — are Mexican nationals who will benefit from the presidential decree, according to the Pew Hispanic Center.

They’re the longest-term residents, and nothing they’ve seen in Mexico over the decades has enticed them to return.

Why?

Mexico, according to the State Department’s country page, experienced average GDP growth of just 1.9% from 1960 to 2011. Income per capita in the same period has risen an average of even less, at 1.8%.

By contrast, Mexico’s labor force has grown an average of 2.2% since 1998 and more than that in the longer run. An average of 54,000 jobs have been created in each of the past five years, while its labor force has grown by about 224,000 a year over the same time, according to CIA World Fact Book and World Bank data.

What’s more, productivity gains have been low, with none lower than in those states that ship the most illegals — Zacatecas, Michoacan, Guerrero, Durango, Chiapas and Oaxaca, according to OECD data.

Unable to employ anywhere near the number who need jobs, it’s no surprise that 58.8% of Mexicans are underemployed or in informal off-the-book employment in the struggle to survive. Faced with that struggle, millions just head north to America.

And by the way, that figure includes 15.47% of all Mexico’s college graduates, according to a study in the Journal of Inter American Studies. (The U.S. figure, by contrast, is 0.45%.)

Tangled tax laws, overregulation, corruption and an unstable currency have all had their hand in the substandard growth that has not kept up with population.

Add to that the ruinous criminality, which has caused the death of hundreds of thousands.

But perhaps Peña Nieto is right to gloat: the U.S. government has done what he wanted, to provide – for the foreseeable future – an escape valve for internal pressures that would otherwise require him to act on.

The Iran-Cuba-Venezuela Nexus

Monday, November 24th, 2014

Mary O’Grady writes on Iran’s presence in Latin America, a topic I have blogged about for the past ten years:


The Iran-Cuba-Venezuela Nexus
The West underestimates the growing threat from radical Islam in the Americas.


The West is well aware of the growing presence of Islamic fundamentalism in the Americas, but policy makers may be underestimating the threat. Joseph Humire is a security analyst and co-editor of “Iran’s Strategic Penetration of Latin America,” a book published earlier this year. In an interview in New York last week, Mr. Humire described Iran’s significant progress, over three decades, in setting up operations in the region.

The earliest stages of the process have featured clandestine operatives using mosques to make connections inside Muslim communities and then using those connections to access wealth and gain political prominence. Where these initial forays have been successful, says Mr. Humire, Iran has opened embassies and established commercial agreements that allow operatives to create businesses, which can be used as fronts for covert operations.

In Venezuela and Bolivia, Iran has moved to the next level, developing a military presence through joint ventures in defense industries. In Venezuela, the state of Aragua, where Mr. El Aissami is now governor, is ground zero for this activity.

Havana applauds this Islamic intervention. Since the rise of chavismo, Cuba has supplied intelligence services to Venezuela and its regional allies, notably Nicaragua, Bolivia and Ecuador. Mr. Humire says it has also supplied passport-information technology to allow these countries to process individuals from the Middle East, hand out new documents and maintain the secrecy of true identities. Cuba has used this capacity to exchange information with like-minded nations, including Russia and Iran.

O’Grady’s article goes on to describe the important role the governor of the state of Aragua and former Venezuela interior minister, Tareck Zaidan El Aissami Maddah, plays in building

“a criminal-terrorist pipeline bringing militant Islamists into Venezuela and surrounding countries, and sending illicit funds from Latin America to the Middle East.”

Cuba wants to get aid from Iran. Keep that in mind when Obama ends the embargo with Cuba.

Ecuador: Assange granted political asylum

Saturday, November 22nd, 2014

Julian Assange ‘welcome to stay in Ecuador embassy’

Ecuador has guaranteed political asylum to WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange for “as long as necessary,” one day after he lost an appeal against a Swedish warrant for his arrest.

Ecuador Ratifies Julian Assange Asylum Status, Offers Sweden Access To WikiLeaks Founder

Ecuador ratified Friday its diplomatic asylum status for WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who has been living in the country’s London embassy since June 2012 to avoid being extradited to Sweden, where he faces sexual assault charges. The move makes official Assange’s protected status and means he can remain under the country’s protection indefinitely.

I do not know for certain what, if any, charges Assange would face in the USA at this point.



Chile: Blowing up the ATMs

Friday, November 21st, 2014

375 of them:

Crooks Blow Up ATMs in Crimes Leaving Chileans Stuck in Line

The method is simple. Use a hose to inject propane into the machine while being careful to seal all cracks and vents with duct tape, then light the fuel with a spark. The top of the machine explodes, leaving the cash tray almost intact.

And then there’s also robbing the armored trucks delivering the money.

Venezuela: Break-in in London

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

Alek Boyd, who investigates chavista corruption, had his London apartment broken into:

They didn’t take my wallet, money, valuables… mind you they even left behind one of their own rain jackets and a mobile phone. Frankly I don’t know whether to laugh or cry about it. On the one hand, I have to respect the boldness of the men who carried out this action. I have used plural all along on purpose, for there is CCTV evidence of at least three men, totally unrelated to the residents of the building where I live, trying to gain access to it. Neither of them bothered to cover their faces. In fact, one of them spoke to the porter and tried to force his way in, in three separate instances, through the front door of the building, while another stood at a very close distance and laughed at the porter. I have got to interpret their boldness as if they purposefully wanted to send a strong message: “we came to your flat, we broke into it in broad daylight, and we can’t care less about being caught by video cameras or be seen.”

Another part of me is convinced that this is most definitely the work of chavistas. For only chavistas can break into a flat to steal laptops containing sensible information and leave behind so much evidence, such as their own phone. This reminds me of the typical Venezuelan “rambos” that make up the “intelligence” forces in that country: smash first and never bother with details. Guapos y apoyaos sort of attitude. But then, if they could do that, it is evident they are prepared to do anything.

Here are CCTV photos of the suspected perpetrators,

Mexico: Remains of #Ayotzinapa students found

Saturday, November 8th, 2014


Demonstrators last month

Mexican Official: Remains Believed to Be Students Found
Investigators have found the incinerated remains they believe belong to the missing 43 students who were allegedly abducted by police and handed over to a local drug gang to be executed, Mexico’s attorney general said.

The remains will be sent to the University of Innsbruck in Austria, which officials said had the most advanced forensics laboratory, for further attempts at identification. Because of the extent of the incineration, Mr. Murillo Karam said he set no deadline.

Mexico missing student: Gang members ‘confess’ to killing 43 in Iguala and burning their bodies