Argentina: Chronicle of a default foretold

Subroto Roy sent this article, Argentine Default Chaos Relived as Blackouts Follow Looting, which describes the deja-vu conditions as the country is about to default, again, this time on its $50 billion foreign currency obligations,

Investors are bracing for the possibility of another default. The country’s average dollar bond yield of 12.4 percent is the highest among major developing nations after Venezuela. Trading in swap contracts that insure bonds shows investors see a 79 percent probability of a halt in payments over the next five years, a reflection in part of concern that Singer’s demand of full repayment on the securities he kept from the 2001 default will disrupt debt servicing.

“Over the next five years”, maybe, maybe earlier, as the Specter of Default Stalks Argentina. Argentina’s dollar reserves have now slipped below $30 billion.

Yesterday’s 8% devaluation (the largest one-day decline since the 2002 country’s default on its debt)

and falling reserves raise the specter of a deep economic crisis with inflation already believed to be running above 25% before the devaluation, the product of years of rapid increases in government spending financed in part by money printing. A weaker currency can aggravate inflation by reducing consumers’ purchasing power and pushing up the cost of imported goods.

The devaluation is also a major political blow to Mrs. Kirchner and her new economic team led by Mr. Kicillof. Shortly after her ruling coalition suffered a steep drop in support in October’s midterm congressional elections, Mrs. Kirchner replaced her finance minister, central bank chief, price control enforcer and economy minister. Less than a year ago, the president told the public it shouldn’t expect a devaluation under her watch.

Cristina Fernandez’s chief of cabinet Jorge Capitanich rushed to put lipstick on a pig, easing restrictions on the purchase of U.S. dollars Friday, by saying “The government considers that the price of the dollar has reached a level of convergence that is acceptable with the objectives of our economic policies.”

And the economy is pining for the fjords,

UPDATE:
As a result of government price-fixing, Argentinians bought less bread and more cookies in 2013. The price of flour went up by 65%.

A parting question: Where’s Cristina?

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2 Responses to “Argentina: Chronicle of a default foretold”

  1. Gringo Says:

    And the economy is pining for the fjords

    Would those be Fjord Falcons the economy is pining for?

  2. Argentina: Chronicle of a default foretold, continued | Fausta's Blog Says:

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