Why has Brazil stagnated?

The Economist is asking, Has Brazil blown it?
A stagnant economy, a bloated state and mass protests mean Dilma Rousseff must change course

The Economist’s op-ed looks at the factors why Brazil’s economy grew by only 0.9% in 2012:

  • The world’s most burdensome tax code
  • Absurdly generous pensions
  • Spending only 1.5% of GDP on infrastructure, compared with a global average of 3.8%
  • Gross public debt has climbed to 60-70% of GDP

The Economist recommends that Brazil do three things:

It needs to rediscover an appetite for reform by reshaping public spending, especially pensions.
. . .
Second, it must make Brazilian business more competitive and encourage it to invest
. . .
Third, Brazil urgently needs political reform

None of this is likely to happen; Carlos Alberto Montaner writes

“All you have to do is read the records of the São Paulo Forum and observe the conduct of the Brazilian government,” he said. “The friends of Luis Inácio Lula da Silva, of Dilma Rousseff and the Workers Party are the enemies of the United States: Chavist Venezuela, first with (Hugo) Chávez and now with (Nicolás) Maduro; Raúl Castro’s Cuba; Iran; Evo Morales’ Bolivia; Libya at the time of Gadhafi; Bashar Assad’s Syria.

“Cuban influence in Brazil is covert but very intense. José Dirceu, Lula da Silva’s former chief of staff and his most influential minister, had been an agent of the Cuban intelligence services. In exile in Cuba, he had his face surgically changed. He returned to Brazil with a new identity (Carlos Henrique Gouveia de Mello, a Jewish merchant) and functioned in that capacity until democracy was restored. Hand in hand with Lula, he placed Brazil among the major collaborators with the Cuban dictatorship. He fell into disgrace because he was corrupt but never retreated one inch from his ideological preferences and his complicity with Havana.”

Yesterday commenter Marcos stated,

please write more about the Forum of Sao Paulo, the organization created by Brazil’s Lula and Castro to change Latin America into an united Marxist region. Brazil has totally fallen to Marxism and is now engaged in the help of all marxist partners.

Brazil has already received the first of 4000 Cuban physicians who will come to indoctrinate Brazilian poor people on the wonders of communism. These guys are not even certified as doctors and are slaves who never see their salaries (money goes directly to Fidel).

Add to that the immense, structural corruption, and the drug trade from fellow Foro member Bolivia.

Back in 2009 The Economist had a picture of the Corcovado Christ as a rocket. Now the rocket is on a crash course:

Is The Economist’s image a good summation of the country’s situation?

You decide.


Tags: , ,

3 Responses to “Why has Brazil stagnated?”

  1. Marcos Says:

    Dear Fausta,
    The marxists in Latin America are not concerned about the economy. They follow the Cloward-Piven strategy to burden the state with pensions and grants in order to stay in power forever. Castro’s Cuba is a mess but he is strong and in power.
    Here is a very troublesome news: Uruguay’s president Mujica has met with George Soros and David Rockefeller this last week in order to discuss the legalization of drug use in Latin America. The new world order tentacles are all over us.
    http://www.25segundos.com/?id=51403&ids=3&accion=deta

  2. Fausta Says:

    Indeed, Marcos, the purpose of any totalitarian regime is to consolidate power around itself.

  3. Brazil: Moody’s lowers outlook | Fausta's Blog Says:

    [...] Last week The Economist was recommending that Brazil do three things, It needs to rediscover an appetite for reform by reshaping public spending, especially pensions. . . . Second, it must make Brazilian business more competitive and encourage it to invest . . . Third, Brazil urgently needs political reform [...]